Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.

George Floyd Anniversary, Black Lives Matter Failure, Woke Capital Corporate Grift

May 25, 2021
Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.
George Floyd Anniversary, Black Lives Matter Failure, Woke Capital Corporate Grift
Chapters
Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.
George Floyd Anniversary, Black Lives Matter Failure, Woke Capital Corporate Grift
May 25, 2021

Today marks the 1-year anniversary of George Floyd’s death after he was killed by Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis, and we review the reaction from around the country. A look at the progress (or lack thereof) in justice reform throughout the United States and the leaders responsible. Remember all those corporations that promised to support racial equity? Did they make good on their promises? We review. And more! Join criminal defense lawyer Robert F. Gruler in a discussion on the latest legal, criminal and political news, including:

🔵 Government officials including Cory Book, Julian Castro and others react to the 1-year anniversary of killing of George Floyd.
🔵 President Biden to meet with the Floyd family, “ear to listen to their perspectives and hear what they have to say” according to Jen Psaki.
🔵 Ben Crump talks to the press, explaining the President Bide and Vice President Kamala Harris spent an hour with the Floyd family.
🔵 The White House releases an official statement on the anniversary of the Floyd killing after meeting with the family, we review the transcript.
🔵 Official U.S. Cable released by the U.S. State department, communicating official support for the BLM agenda.
🔵 Black Lives Matter showing rift with Democrats one year after the protests started in the aftermath of the Floyd killing.
🔵 BLM still has not changed their list of demands: https://blacklivesmatter.com/blm-dema...
🔵 New York Times struggles to figure out why support for BLM is dwindling in the aftermath of the 2020 unrest.
🔵 BLM founder Cullors labels police a “terrorist organization” and explains she has always wanted to “fight them”.
🔵 Remember the CEOs and corporations that made racial equity pledges in the aftermath of the George Floyd killings – what happened to them?
🔵 What happened to company cultures after May 2020 regarding the use of the phrases “systemic racism” and “Black Lives Matter”
🔵 Employers prefer discussing anti-bias training rather than pay equity data.
🔵 The difference between woke capital, communist capital and crypto capital.
🔵 Your questions from Locals.com after each segment!

LIVECHAT QUESTIONS:
💬 https://watchingthewatchers.locals.com/

Channel List:
🕵️‍♀️ Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq. LIVE - https://www.rrlaw.tv
🎥 Robert Gruler Esq. - https://www.youtube/c/RobertGruler
📈 Robert Gruler Crypto - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUkU...
👮‍♂️ R&R Law Group -

Show Notes Transcript

Today marks the 1-year anniversary of George Floyd’s death after he was killed by Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis, and we review the reaction from around the country. A look at the progress (or lack thereof) in justice reform throughout the United States and the leaders responsible. Remember all those corporations that promised to support racial equity? Did they make good on their promises? We review. And more! Join criminal defense lawyer Robert F. Gruler in a discussion on the latest legal, criminal and political news, including:

🔵 Government officials including Cory Book, Julian Castro and others react to the 1-year anniversary of killing of George Floyd.
🔵 President Biden to meet with the Floyd family, “ear to listen to their perspectives and hear what they have to say” according to Jen Psaki.
🔵 Ben Crump talks to the press, explaining the President Bide and Vice President Kamala Harris spent an hour with the Floyd family.
🔵 The White House releases an official statement on the anniversary of the Floyd killing after meeting with the family, we review the transcript.
🔵 Official U.S. Cable released by the U.S. State department, communicating official support for the BLM agenda.
🔵 Black Lives Matter showing rift with Democrats one year after the protests started in the aftermath of the Floyd killing.
🔵 BLM still has not changed their list of demands: https://blacklivesmatter.com/blm-dema...
🔵 New York Times struggles to figure out why support for BLM is dwindling in the aftermath of the 2020 unrest.
🔵 BLM founder Cullors labels police a “terrorist organization” and explains she has always wanted to “fight them”.
🔵 Remember the CEOs and corporations that made racial equity pledges in the aftermath of the George Floyd killings – what happened to them?
🔵 What happened to company cultures after May 2020 regarding the use of the phrases “systemic racism” and “Black Lives Matter”
🔵 Employers prefer discussing anti-bias training rather than pay equity data.
🔵 The difference between woke capital, communist capital and crypto capital.
🔵 Your questions from Locals.com after each segment!

LIVECHAT QUESTIONS:
💬 https://watchingthewatchers.locals.com/

Channel List:
🕵️‍♀️ Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq. LIVE - https://www.rrlaw.tv
🎥 Robert Gruler Esq. - https://www.youtube/c/RobertGruler
📈 Robert Gruler Crypto - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUkU...
👮‍♂️ R&R Law Group -

Speaker 1:

Hello, my friends. And welcome back to yet. Another episode of watching the Watchers live. My name is Robert ruler. I am a criminal defense attorney here at the RNR law group and the always beautiful and sunny Scottsdale Arizona, where my team and I over the course of many years have represented thousands of good people facing criminal charges. And throughout our time in practice, we have seen a lot of problems with our justice system. I'm talking about misconduct involving the police. We have prosecutors behaving poorly. We have judges not particularly interested in a little thing called justice, and it all starts with the politicians, the people at the top, the ones who write the rules and pass the laws that they expect you and me to follow, but sometimes have a little bit of difficulty doing so themselves. That's why we started this show called watching the Watchers so that together with your help, we can shine that big , beautiful spotlight of accountability and transparency back down upon our system with a hope of finding justice. And we're grateful that you are here and with us today, we've got a lot to get into, but we're kind of going to be following the scene theme today, of course, is the one-year anniversary of the death of George Floyd killed by Derek Shovan back on May 25th, 2020. We spent a lot of time on this channel, dissecting everything that went on throughout that entire incident and case , and a lot of the resulting turmoil and consequences. And so today , uh, the , the nation kind of stopped pause for a moment to remember George Floyd and everything that this country has been through as a result of this incident. So we're going to break that down. We're going to talk about what some of the reaction has been from many of our elected officials, you know, the people who are responsible for sort of running the justice system while they've all had a full year to reflect, and we want to see what they have to say for themselves, because they're responsible for fixing the problems that they're upset about. And we'll see if they did anything about it. We're going to hear from Corey Booker, we got Julian Castro , uh , president and Biden, in fact, met with the Floyd family. He wanted to get their perspective on justice reform. Now that they've got $27 million, they've got a lot of perspective. Ben Crump, of course the family attorney was out there talking to the press. And so a lot of people were , were, you know , having a date today, having a moment, the white house released an official statement as well, and a U S cable was sent out by the U S secretary of state that is sort of confirming that the official position of the U S government is going to be in support of BLM black lives matter. We're going to go through that official us cable here on the program, and we're going to read through it. And we're going to show you what it says. Then you can decide for yourself, is this an official statement from the government that they are sort of endorsing BLM ideology? Because if so, that's interesting because some of the ideology, the demands that BLM actually has on their website today are questionable. And it's kind of curious that our government would be in alignment with some of those concepts. So what we'll see if , if , uh , that , that shakes out , uh , the way that I think it will, then we're going to talk about what is happening with the CEOs and all of these corporations that if you recall last year, they were all on board with justice reform. In fact, the whole country was until BLM got involved. Everybody really wanted to see some significant changes in this country until we started to make this a left versus right thing, which unfortunately is what this has become. But there were a lot of CEOs and there were a lot of corporations that were really piling in here going, you know, we are all about equity and racial justice and harmony in America. Since somehow we were birthed out of original sin. And the question now is, well , have they put their money where their mouth is? Did they make good on any of those pledges or any of those promises? We have an article over from the financial times that we're going to break down. So we've got a lot to get to , if you want to be a part of the show, you can, by going over to watching the watchers.locals.com , which is where we have our community. And so you can ask questions, there's a live chat that's happening right now as we're broadcasting and Ms. Faith is clipping those questions and she's going to insert them into my slide deck. So we'll get to those and you really do support the show it's [email protected] would invite you to check that out. We also have a couple of new channels that we have in the description below, including a crypto channel, which I'm having a lot of fun with release the new video on that channel this morning. So if you want to go check that out, the link is in the description below. I appreciate your support over there. If you are interested in that topic, if not, well , stick here, because we're going to get into some news of the date. George Floyd, his anniversary of his death is today May 25th, 2021. If you recall, one year ago, the entire country sort of paused as, as soon as we saw that image, that video footage of Derrick Shovan with his knee on the back of George Floyd's neck. And so we spent a lot of time on this channel, dissecting everything that happened, multiple angles, body cameras. We covered the trial every single day that it went on and we analyzed the outcome of the verdict. And we're still analyzing it. We're still trying to determine what really is going to happen because there were some, I would say, improprieties or , uh, problems that happened during the trial. That of course, Derek Shovan is going to be contesting in his appeal when he takes his appeal and finalizes his motion that are all post-conviction motions that we already know are coming because he's a defense attorney. Eric Nelson has told us. So, so a lot has been happening here. And now that a year has passed, everybody has had some time to reflect has, have we, as a country evolved, have we grown? Has anything changed? Have we emerged stronger as a result of this? And in fact, this is the very question that was being asked on a poster that was being spread around today for the remembrance ceremony of George Floyd's Memorial. So apparently there's a foundation called the George Floyd Memorial foundation, and they have a inaugural remembrance, which was scheduled for a May 23rd, which was over the weekend to today, May 25th. And they're noting that they're going to have a downtown Minneapolis rally, 4:00 PM , a peaceful rally peaceful, and it's going to be on Sunday, May 23rd. So , uh , they asked the question, the same question that I'm asking here. One year what's changed. What's changed because when we all saw the video that day , uh , of Derek Shovan and George Floyd, I think the entire country was sort of disgusted by what we saw and for a brief moment for that glimmering. Second, we all maybe had some momentum to actually talk about justice reform in this country. Very excited about it as somebody who's a criminal defense lawyer, I was thinking, wow, this is finally the moment where we're going to be able to talk about some important issues about accountability and transparency. And maybe finally, a lot of these issues will come to the forefront. Well, lo and behold, we fast forward a couple months, even a couple of weeks, and we turn on the news and now we have a lot of protestors and social unrest and BLM and Antifa and their torching Wendy's and use tire shops and car dealerships, and generally causing mayhem. And so what happened immediately after that? Well, there was more division and this became a left versus right thing. Then BLM started sort of aligning themselves with the Democrats and then the police started aligning themselves with the Republicans and then that's kind of all she wrote. And now it turns into this racial division problem. And you know, now BLM demands is we're going to see in the show today, they're demanding that Donald Trump be convicted of a crime and you're going, what the hell did that have to do with George Floyd or police brutality? What did Donald Trump who passed first step back, have to do with any of this stuff? Uh , and so, you know, it's turned into this political , uh , food fight, and it's just been really disappointing for somebody who wants to see actual criminal justice reform. So as we go through this, we're going to hear some reactions of our elected leaders, the people who we want to fix these problems that we sort of interest with solving these issues. We're going to see if they've done anything. And as we go through this segment, of course, we want to pay tribute to George Floyd , right? He was, he did, he was killed. The law says that he was murdered. According to the jury, still have some questions about the presumption of innocence and the beyond a reasonable doubt and some of the impartiality and all that . But those are separate. And apart from the, the, the main question here is that we want to honor life. We want to respect the dead and remember the pain and sort of the, the impact that he has had on this country one way or the other, right? We, we , the entire nation stopped to deal with this and, and specifically to pay attention with , uh , the Shovan trial. So we want to , you know, go through this with some empathy in some respect and some reverence for George Floyd, his family, and all of the people in this country that have been touched by this loss. We also want to make sure that we're staying in touch with, we also are going to call it straight here on this show and on this channel and got to remember that George Floyd was not a Saint. He wasn't your mother Theresa out there. And he sort of being elevated to this position where there's sort of this hagiography happening, where everybody is saying that this was, this is a sort of a symbol of the best that we have to offer of America regarding racial justice and, you know, sort of emanating from the African-American kids unity. And I'm thinking, you know, there, there are. So there , there are so many other incredible things that we can talk about that we don't have to make this equivalence between everything. Okay, George Floyd , he was a tragic death and we're sorry that he's not here, but he also wasn't a Saint. Okay. We in things can be true. And we can discuss this case with empathy without having to go one way or the other. Okay. If you are sort of on the right side of the aisle, on this topic, many people, they wake up and they go, George Floyd was just a drug addict and he was a drag of society. And he's not worthy of any consideration or any empathy at all. And anybody who throws their hands up at the police if they get killed. So what, I don't even care about that, right? That that's sort of far on that one side. And on the other side, we have this idea that George Floyd is a Saint and that he's walking around like the second coming or something, and you're going , that's not right. Either, either. So if we want to be true and accurate, if we want to be at least reasonable and rational, I think we got to find something in the middle. We're going to try to do that today as we go through some of these reactions. So first and foremost, from USA today, we have , uh , they're saying that they went around and they talked about what Floyd's death meant to them as leaders from around the nation. They said that they use words like trauma, turmoil, fear, and sadness, but hope that things might be different this time that justice might prevail. So, you know, when I hear this type of guard, I don't know what this means that justice might prevail, because it sounds like Derek Shovan was convicted, that the fight for change would lead to tangible results. For some, those results include the passage of the George Floyd act, right? Which bands , chokehold and no knock warrants and limits qualified immunity. So police officers aren't shielded from certain lawsuits. The legislation which passed the house of representatives in March would also prohibit racial and religious profiling create a national police misconduct registry that would compile complaints. All these leaders say something has to change the mayor of Atlanta, worried about her for black children, a human rights leader described feeling yanked out of his body. America's poet Laureate said she had witnessed a public lynching, right ? So, you know, some, some strong language, you know, I okay. If all right, let's get let's continue on before I get all riled up. I can't get riled up too soon. I got to pace myself. The show just starts relax. All right, we'll get there. We have America breathe. A sigh of relief coming from Julian Castro, a former mayor of San Antonio, secretary of housing and urban development under Obama. And he ran for president. One year later, it's clear that George Floyd's murder will serve as a marker in history, by which we measure our progress towards racial equality. Floyd's death helps spark the largest protest movement in our nation's history. One that inspired tens of millions of Americans to say unequivocally, that black lives matter. It's a movement led by organizers and activists carried the weight of the lives lost before Floyd like brown garner, bland, Brianna Taylor, and a couple others. America breathe a sigh of relief as Floyd's killer Shovan was convicted for murder. Yet it was about a small measure of justice against the backdrop of nearly 1000 lives lost to police violence in the time of, since his death. So you just have to, you know, a thousand lives lost to police violence. And I've seen this meme started spreading around here and what I actually got into it with somebody on Twitter about this, somebody said, well, police violence is responsible for killing, you know, a thousand people. I said, violence, what are you talking about? You mean like , like, did they, you know , murder them, you know, violence, the way that I understand the definition and you can look this up. There's, there's sort of a , uh, an implication that it's done without legitimacy. Like it's not justified if it's violent. That means you're sort of acting outside of proper behavior. There's sort of a , uh , an unacceptable newness to it. It's not normal versus justified action. Cave . Self-defense is typically not violence . It technically you are doing something that might look like violence, but you say this was violent when it was not legitimate. When it was unjustified is sort of how I use the term. Now, technically, if you look at the definition, you can make arguments about that. So it's sort of one of those words, that's right down in the middle and you know, the way that I've always used it, it's when it's illegitimate. If it's legitimate, you don't call it violent. You call it. No , I punched that guy in the face. Why? Cause he swung at me first. I wasn't being violent. He was being violent. I ended the violent confrontation. I wasn't, but I was justified by hitting him back or shooting back. It's a small sliver of nuance there, but here, what they're talking about is police violence resulting in a thousand dead or nearly a thousand lives. So is he, is he saying that every single one of those was like the equivalent of what happened between Shovan and Floyd was every single one of those thousand deaths, totally unjustified. Were those all a result of police violence? I mean, do we have police killing multiple people every day violently or are some of those justified are some of those acts actually necessary and maybe shouldn't be categorized in that same bucket of police, violent deaths. So it's, it's, it's manipulating, it's it's persuasion to make his point . And I just think it's disingenuous. Chauvin's conviction reminded us that the disc that despite some progress towards racial justice in the last year, we haven't made nearly enough. It was a reminder that the movement sparked by George Floyd death is more than about just one, man. It's about tearing down here. It is the systemic racism that prevents us from achieving full equality. In fact, true justice for Floyd and other victims of police. Won't be realized until we re-imagined public safety to protect all people equally, may we have the courage to do so we've got over here, Bernice king, she's the youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther king and Coretta Scott King. She's part of the Martin Luther king center for nonviolent social change. She says, we've got some difficult days ahead. My father Martin Luther king Jr. Made this statement on the Eve before he was assassinated 53 years ago. He knew that if we did not heed his prophetic warning, telling us that the clock of destiny is taking out now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksand of racial injustice, we would face difficult days as we encountered extremely difficult days. When technology capture nine minutes, 29 seconds, I cried and breathed a sigh of relief when Shovan was found guilty. I know the trauma and the turmoil in the hearts and minds of many persists. It's my hope that we can elevate our strategy for true peace and conversation around who we should be as an interconnected humanity. All right . So in this critical hour, we must by multitudes rise to be love, implement demands of jut , nothing saying nothing here. This will prevent an alternative outcome. Make justice a priority. Social tensions will grow. Apple says absolutely nothing, but you know, she's not a politician. She's the daughter. So don't expect anything meaningful , uh , when you're sort of giving these, these generic statements, right? It's just, just , just generic statements. So here's another one from Corey Booker we have here. He says George Floyd was a loving father, devoted brother, someone whose smile lit up a room. George Floyd's life matters . Since I was born to be black in America, learn how to protect ourselves in the wake of Floyd's death. We have seen a nation awakened to the reality. Black Americans live every day , see people across the country and across the world demonstrate that changing the reality we live in is not an impossible task. It's our collective calling. Great Americans have demonstrated not just the right words, not just our voices, but action. All right , well , uh, you you're a us Senator from New Jersey. So house of representatives has already passed the George Floyd bill. So you and your 51 other or 40 , uh, 49 other plus comma layers . You make 51. So maybe you can get some momentum on that and pass some bills. Now Joe Biden president by met with the Floyd family today, uncertain progress on a race written by Cleve Watson Jr . Over at the Washington post on Tuesday a year, family members, Floyd family went to go visit Biden. Sakhi press secretary at the white house said Biden is eager to listen to their perspectives and to hear what they have to say. An unfulfilled promise looms over the meeting as progress on police reform has stagnated [inaudible] , including legislation bearing Floyd's name that Biden hope would be on, would be law on the anniversary of his death. But that didn't happen . Bernice Lord , in an organizer with Tampa dream defenders, a group that aimed at ending police prisons said, do you believe that flying Floyd's family up and stuff like that? It's a nice gesture, but it's not the change we need. She's right. She's right. It's all just a bunch of show. She says, we need deep deep shifts and how we view public public safety in these cities. Martin was a black 17 year old from Florida who was shot and killed in 2012 by a local resident. Former president Trump regularly made racially charged statements and was hostile to BLM to riding them as violent thugs by and in many ways, framed his presidential running opposition to that making racial equity central to his campaign that raise hopes among civil rights leaders that he would enact far reaching and long overdue changes. But I've been screaming about it . This, this guy has a record of 30 years of putting people in prison. Insiding with law enforcement and big bureaucracies that are set up to facilitate the entire operation of that facility, that organization for 30 years. Okay. And Kamala Harris, she's been doing it for less than that, but also substantially when she was a prosecutor and then the attorney general for California. So anybody who bought into this fake hoax that they were going to suddenly do something about justice reform. Oh , well, I'm sorry that you fell for it. But we knew that was coming here is a clip from a , what is this from GMA? Uh , ABC news. This looks like that guy here. He is George

Speaker 2:

Right here at the white house. Floyd's family, including his seven-year-old daughter Geanna are going to be here at this point, the white house, you said it was private. Isn't going to allow cameras inside for this meeting. Now you'll remember this. The president, after that Shovan verdict spoke directly with the Floyd family. He told them he would get police reform passed. He said that this would be the first opportunity to deal with genuine systemic racism. But George, the president then set that deadline for that to happen today. Right now, though, Congress is at a stalemate on

Speaker 3:

This issue, seems to be , uh , the bipartisan negotiations seem to be stalled over this whole issue of immunity for police officers.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, exactly. But the key is here. There are bipartisan talks happening, both sides just yesterday said that they are making progress. The house did pass some sort of police reform that would include banning choke holds ending no knock warrants. But the issue is in this 50 50 split Senate where Democrats need Republicans to get on board in order to pass this there's real disagreement right now over this issue of qualified immunity. This is basically , uh , the ability to hold officers legally accountable for misconduct. I asked the white house yesterday, are they going to move forward on police reform? The press secretary secretary told me that they believe they will be able to make progress, but right now, George, this deadline is set

Speaker 3:

To come and go, okay, see you . Thanks very much. We're going to have a lot more on George Floyd . The impact his murder

Speaker 1:

Has had on our Stephanopoulos . That's that guy's name? So they , uh, obviously, you know, we're, we're trying, you know, we're trying it's those Republicans again, they're not letting us get anything through its qualified immunity. You know, they love those police officers Biden. When the Floyd family was there , knelt in sympathy with protesters during his first in-person campaign event, during the pandemic made history by selecting Kamala Harris during his first joint session, he urged lawmakers to pass police reform by may 25. Obviously today is May 25th. They didn't do that. Shovan was found guilty of murder. He says, we're going to do a lot more to get more done. We're going to stay at it until we get it done. This is gonna be the first shot at dealing with genuine systemic racism. So, all right , let's see if they can get it done. But the black community, like many other Americans is divided on whether Biden and other national leaders have fulfilled their promise. Few dispute that Biden has elevated black Americans and other people to more prominent positions than any of his predecessors. Though . Some note, his inner circle is still largely white racist. He speaks regularly about structural racism and he decided his Corona virus relief package to address racial inequities, which is actually now getting challenged, challenged. I think he just lost that actually , uh, in a court of , uh , a federal district court, separate video, but a criminal justice reform bill that he passed in the house has stalled skeptical activists, where he, the energy that motivated millions to protest won't be enough to overcome the inertia of Washington. And it sort of feels like that. Doesn't it kind of feels like the criminal justice energy has just sort of been deflated ever since Shovan was convicted. If Shovan would have been like maybe a split verdict or if he would have been acquitted on all charges. Well then certainly that energy momentum would have been steamrolling ahead. But since they got everything that they wanted, including 27 million for the Floyd family, we've got a number of other officers that have been charged as a result of their crimes. And so it sounds like things are kind of moving their direction. So maybe some of the , the energy is deflating out. And if that can continue to dissipate, which is all part of the strategy, then they don't have to do anything. They don't have to pass anything. Nothing changes at all. George Floyd's anniversary comes and goes. Everybody just bring him in here, bring the family and do a press conference. Show everybody around, oh, look, we're going to, Hey, this is great. That's it? Nothing gets done. Why? Because they're all politicians. They don't do anything. They just talk a lot. And they release statements and like Cory Booker and all ended Julian Castro, they say nothing. They're all in the government. They've been in the government for as long as I've been alive, Joe Biden in many of these people and nothing gets done. In fact, they do the opposite. So we'll see if anything happens here. Some have been concerned for months that Biden a moderate who was criticized during the campaign campaign for speaking kindly of segregation, as senators who told the host of a radio show aimed at a black audience, that if they selected Trump over him, then you ain't black was ill-equipped to tackle the problems. Yeah, no kidding. But Donald Trump was the racist. Since Biden's election rising crime in us, cities has made many politicians, even more wary of proposals to defund the police because it's a stupid idea, a key aim of many protest movements. Since Lorenda led demonstrators in protests through the streets, the ladder has voted to increase police funding by $13 folks. The reason I get so irritated about this is because the , these debates and these fake attempts at trying to solve anything are just wrecking the entire movement. I mean, w when every time we hit a little bit of a roadblock here, nothing gets done. And so we had all of this momentum to go one direction, and now we're just seeing people drop the ball left and right. And it's just so irritating. The reality is what we're doing right now. Isn't working. We need to try something different. And that's a long and hard conversation. I think people get scared when they hear defund the police, because they feel like we're going to go to backs back to some kind of wild, wild west light kind of life. Right, exactly right. Defund, the , the police movement is counter productive . It doesn't accomplish any goals at all. And for some reason, they're still using it. A senior Biden advisor has engaged minority communities on behalf of the white house. Buy-ins coronavirus relief package. For example, included billions for disadvantaged farmers about a quarter of whom are black. So as I'm just coming from an event with black farmers where we're educating them on how to get the loans paid off 5 billion in terms of down payment, on equity, in that space, pretty sure that a federal court threw that out though. He also cited statistics and the American rescue plan, they reduced black poverty. And on and on, he also said that Biden and others in the administration continue to work with a bipartisan group to find common ground on police reform says there's no magic wand says a former Senator from Louisiana. It's hard work. Okay. It's complicated. It's time consuming . Senator Booker said the talks have been meaningful that he and Tim had gotten an honest negotiation going, and they were trying to get a good place. We support that. We don't want to rush bail . We want a meaningful bill. Okay. So Corey Booker Tim, Scott, others. They said they're still working towards the deal. Still working through our key differences on key issues. They said Laura and Dan says she and other demonstrators never expected the government to take the lead saying this has to come from ordinary people. She says, I'm encouraged because I see people have continued to stay in the streets. Like people who have continued to be public and more and more and more, we just need our government to catch up to where the people are. So, you know, she's frustrated from a different perspective. I'm frustrated from a different perspective. Everybody's just kinda tired of it. Meanwhile, all of our politicians are just out there just talking, just talking, oh, we're negotiating still about what? Qualified immunity. Oh, that's holding up the entire bill, the everything. Okay. You sure you can't work that out. The whole, the entire, the entire package is held up because of qualified immunity. Can you leave that part out and pass something else and , or, or show us what a framework for a bill would be? Here's Ben Crump out there in front of the press as always

Speaker 4:

The president and the vice president met with the family for over an hour. Uh, and they're going to tell you some things that happened in that meeting. I know the president was very , uh, personal because he got to know this family over the years and he wanted to check on them on today of all days to see how they were doing to reiterate that they are still doing everything, to make sure that his legacy is respected. And that involves us going to meet with senators in just a few moments to continue to press forward for the Georgia , Florida justice and police . In that, that he says he is ready to sign any day. He said that he doesn't want to sign a bill that doesn't have substance and meaning. So he is going to be patient to make sure it's the right bill, not a rush bill. Uh, also the family encouraged the president to continue to meet with the civil rights leaders and advocacy groups who have been working on this for decades. Like Reverend Allen, the NAACP and the national urban league, and many others.

Speaker 1:

All right . So, you know, when you hear phrases like that, we want the right bill, not a rushed bill. You go, oh, that's just political BS speak, meaning that there's not going to be any bill because they don't agree on what to do. And I think both parties are in alignment on this. I don't blame the Democrats. I don't blame the Republicans. I think that they're both really, really truthfully kind of anti justice reform. I know that the Democrats play along with this, but they, you know, they don't, they know, they know that defund , the police is not a reasonable solution. And so they throw that out there to placate the far left, who want to do that, knowing that really the base of the democratic party wants nothing to do with that. So they just kind of float that out there. But knowing that the , the bread and butter of the party have no interest in defunding the police at all. And so they're not going to make a move. That's going to alienate the base of their party. That would be insane. Here is the statement from Joe Biden on the first anniversary, he says today in the oval office, I met with Floyd family. It's been a year since all of that nine minutes, 29 seconds. You have to Floyd family, extraordinary courage. A daughter told me, daddy changed the world. He has his murder, launched a summer of protest, civil rights. Era's last month's conviction of the police officer who murdered Floyd didn't even use his name. Well , didn't even use Chauvin's name in that. So look at that. No, Shovan to deliver real change. We must have accountability when law enforcement officers violate their oath. Okay? So accountability, we see , we need to build lasting trust between them. The majority of the men and women who wear the badge, honorably in the communities they serve, we must have accountability and trust in our justice system and negotiate patients on the George Floyd act are ongoing. I have strongly supported the legislation. I appreciate the good faith efforts. It's my hope. They'll get a bill to my desk. We have to act. We have an inflection point. It's battle for the soul of America. Oh my gosh. Uh , tired of that phrase. So administration beats the hell out of that one. So now we know that they're gonna , you know , keep moving forward with this attempt at a bill. We'll see if anything happens. Formally. The us state department is now supporting the BLM , uh , ideology and formal cables that they're sending to different countries. Nations states around the world. This article is over from human events and take a look at who's over here. If you're familiar with Twitter, you probably know who Jack [inaudible] is. And he went over to human events. Very recently. He announced this on Twitter and he got an exclusive, says that a leaked steep state department memo indicates official support for the BLM agenda. And so you may be wondering what the BLM agenda is. I'm going to show you that here in a , in a little bit in the next segment, but it is curious now that sounds like our government is telling other governments. This is the official position of the United States, a source within the Biden state department, wishing to remain anonymous. So keep that in context , uh, indicates that all us diplomatic and consular posts are being encouraged to display shows of support for BLM on Tuesday, May 25th, the one-year anniversary of the death, the memo reads in part, I'm going to show you this, which is why, I mean, it looks, it looks official to me. Uh , the department supports the use of the term. This is what this is. They wrote this in there. The department supports the use of the term black lives matter in messaging, content speeches, and other diplomatic engagements with foreign audiences to advance racial equity and access to justice on May 25th and beyond. Okay. So it's not just ending today. Isn't what just a , you know, a one-year anniversary in , in memoriam type of an event. This is yeah . In the future. Just feel free to run one run with that. We encourage posts to focus on the need to eliminate systemic racism and its continued impact. And do you remember what one consequence of this type of language was? Remember we played it here on this show. Uh, Anthony Blinken, the secretary of state for the United States had that delegation where he was meeting with the Chinese and the came over. And so, and so the Chinese consulates on the other side, Anthony Blinken is on one side of the table and Anthony Blinken , uh, or Antony Blinken reads his statement and he's reading down. He says , you know, the us is really concerned about what you're doing with the weaker is up there in China. And you know, all of these problems and the Chinese consulate says, what did you just say to me? You're calling me a racist. You're calling what we're doing. Genocide. How about this? You just had your entire country wrecked for the entire summer because of your racism United States, because you people don't know how to handle your own internal affairs. How about you get your house in order and deal with your racial, ethnic, ethnic problems before you come and throw stones at the Chinese in our house and aunt Anthony blink like, oh , what just happened? Okay. It didn't go well. And it was a big slap in the face too , to the American state department. And you know, of course the media didn't, didn't really emphasize that a lot, but a lot of people watch that and thought, oh God, this guy's way in over his head because we're talking, we're playing two different games. They're playing the communist world domination game. We're playing woke America don't hurt your fee fees because we don't want to offend anybody game. And it doesn't work well on the international stage. The memo now, which is coming out of Blinken state department says it , which is in part a woke statement on social justice. Now this is back to post-Olympics commentary and it's a part apology for us actions, despite the documented actions of BLM protesters during the 2020 riots, despite New York times reporting our federal government, nonetheless decided to endorse and promote with admitted Marxist root BLM people, which I , which I think is actually a fair characterization of that. You can go and look at their own website and connect it to some sort of Marxists teachings. Now, this is a copy of the unclassified state department memo that the Sobek posted. You can see this was , uh , dated May 22nd. This is the subject header here says commemorating George Floyd, diplomatic engagement and use of black lives matter language and material official statement, reference, and executive order that Biden passed previously. This looks like they're tagging it to where it's going. We've got, you know , all diplomatic and consular post collective immediately from the secretary of state out of Washington, DC. Here's what it says, unclassified. This is an action request. Please see paragraph 13 summary May 25th marks the one year since the brutal murder of George Floyd. And again, nine minutes, 29 seconds that goes in. Anytime you're talking about George flood , you'd have to make sure there's a sentence in there of nine minutes and 29 seconds. Otherwise it's not a real article. One year later, many in the international community will honor Floyd and acknowledge the long journey that nations face May 25th, one year commemoration police brutality. January 20th is one of his first official actions. Biden signed executive order one, three, nine, eight, five, doing all of this stuff. So this effort is a top priority, wants to achieve his policy objectives here by condemning and combating racism. We have the intolerance against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. We've got the white house policy council. We have the memorandum on LGBTQ eye plus people around the world. We have racial equity and support for underserved communities. So now we have under paragraph one, the department policy with respect to advancing racial equity, as part of our supporting our nation's interests are as follows that go through the whole list here, right? Partnering with like-minded nations, promoting democratic principles, combating violence and discrimination against members of racial, ethnic, or other underserved communities, building coalitions, expanding and so on. And so on the documents below provide the talking points and press guidance on racial, inequity and discrimination. They go down, they give us a list of everything that's in here, remarks by the ambassador and on and on and on according to U S bachelor , special counsel , social movement, BLM gain prominence outlined by 2020 guidance. So here, what they're saying is you can actually participate this. And so what they're doing is they're giving us some , some sort of official kind of legal guidance as to why this is authorized. They're saying, listen, we already talked about this in 2020, there was the office of the special counsel. They wrote this, they said, Hey, the hatch act generally allows employees to engage in BLM related activity while on duty or in the workplace, but as described below , uh , they're still prohibited from combining BLM activity with quote political activity while on duty or in the workplace and from engaging in partisan political fundraising. So they're saying you can engage in BLM related activity, but not combining it with political activity. Which to me sounds like it's the same thing. What's the difference between the two isn't BLM related activity, also political activity, political activity. They define as an activity directed toward the success or failure of a political party. Oh, so it's not that, oh, but how about this? A partisan political group. So is BLM a partisan political group? Well, if you look at their website, one of their demands is that Donald Trump never run for office again. And he be convicted. That sounds pretty partisan because he is the leader of a political party in the United States. This carries on guidance on BLM displays. So any BLM displays within the interior of the mission? Well, they can, they're allowed, they're allowed. They're at the chief of the mission's discretion is outlined below. They may decide to hang BLM flags. I wonder if they would allow like tea party flags. I wonder if they would allow that or like a mega flag, would they allow a mega flag? Or how about a don't tread on me flag. I wonder if that would be allowed there any external facing flag pole to any chiefs so that they get to decide that we have us code that defines what to do with the flags action requests , posts are strongly encourage to make. So when they're talking about posts, okay, so like social media posts, posts are strongly encouraged to make full use of department tools and resources to promote policy objectives and to advance racial equity and support for underserved communities. So you can take that to me in what you want it to mean. Postmate use the full content of their evergreen content. The department stands ready to assist posts. So again , I guess maybe this is PO , oh, so that's not social media posts. This will be posts like people at the different , uh, um, uh, like deployments. So the people who are at these different teams, posts are strongly encouraged to make use of all the tools and the resources. So not just in social media. Now, I think there was some , there was something in here. I got confused about social media, but you CA you get the point. Kate it's an official state cable says, feel free, go ahead and use all this stuff. Talk about it. However you want. Let's take a [email protected] . We have boxy punk chick is in the house, says when I hear from BLM, talk about how they're all for blacks. Why did their followers have so many issues with people? Candace Owen? She is black kind of seems like total hypocrisy. Well, it's, it's sort of, you have to be black, the same ideology. It's not just skin color. You have to be. I , I think, I think that's how that works because there are a lot of very , uh, I think, I think they're black. I think they identify that way. Like, I don't know , justice is for example, right? Why don't they like him all that much because he's, he doesn't subscribe to their ideology. So it's more about ideology than it is about race. If you don't subscribe to the look at Caitlyn Jenner, she got thrown out pretty quickly. Cause she didn't subscribe to the ideology, Sharon Quintin . He says BLM and their supporters, for example, Antifa will never be satisfied until they see their boots on the next of all white people. They have zero interest in justice reform. They are total racist, CRT, racism. They are making a martyr of George Florida. I'm waiting for the song. Yeah. It's it feels like there , there will never be a point in which anybody says, finally, we solve this. Got it. This is working. Justice system is working. We nailed it. Now . Shop America never going to happen. LT 13 says, when is anyone going to talk about personal responsibility? No one even cares to mention trying to live an honest non-criminal life. I have seen firsthand the effects of absent parents. Most of my students. Yeah . They live with their grandparents that makes a deep wound in their hearts. And the cycle of hurt people hurt people continues. Oh, that's beautiful. Hurt people, hurt people. Right. It's Bravo. It's like you can't punish the pain out of people. If they're hurt, they're going to hurt others. Yeah, it is. It's a good question. You know, I think that absolutely has to be part of the conversation. You know, it sounds like right now we're only talking about the police, but I think that that's not fair. They're one part of the problem because they also have to work with a society, sort of the ying and the yang. We've got two components. I think if we want a solution that represents both people, we need both parties to the table. We need to hear from both perspectives. We have Dr . Renal and the house says Biden needs to get his time machine and meet with his former less hair plug self Avengers style. Specifically as chairman of the Senate judiciary, he crafted the legislation. These people are complaining about. I know, I know it's so funny, it's it really is like amazing. So you know, all of these democratic senators, all of these, I mean Democrats in general, anybody in this country who's upset with the state of our criminal justice system. They don't realize that Joe Biden built the entire thing and I'm not kidding. He passed the bill in 1984, another one in 1986, pass another one, 1988, pass another one in 1994, all of them having to do with criminal justice reform. And uh, at one point he said that any single bill that had anything to do with criminal justice reform that came out of Congress since 1976 had his stinkin name on it. He said that, and go look that quote up. So he built the entire system, everything mandatory sentencing, three strikes, rules, this stuff, Joe Biden. And guess who was his copilot in this whole thing? Carla eras . Because as Joe Biden was passing the rules, she was enforcing the rules as prosecutor and attorney general from California. So now all of these people are sitting in the white house going, oh yeah, we hear your plight. This is just so horrendous. We're going to really Institute some meaningful change now. And they're going, yeah, I know we just met with them in the , uh, Ben Crump's out that we just met Biden and Kamel up there. They're really focused on this. They're you know, they're not going to rush a bill. They're going to get the right bill. So just hang tight. Yeah. Going back with his third of $27 million, he's doing okay. Whether there's a bill or not sharing quit. And he says, I'm so sick of the lie that Trump made racially charged remarks during his presidency, black unemployment was at historic lows. Why can't anybody remember that the Democrats were the party of slavery and Lincoln was a Republican. Yes. I love that. We have high deserts as Rob. What is your take on all civilian police review board? So, you know, I haven't seen enough of them to be honest. I would like to see some data on this. You know, I, I, I sort of, I would like to see what they make up is your , your question is sort of general. And so, you know, there are some ideas that I've seen float around where you have, maybe it's a civilian police review board so that it's not, you know , um, officers on the board or law enforcement officials, but you have, maybe you have two prosecutors, you have two defense attorneys and you have a judge and these people volunteer for a council like this. And so you sort of take it out of the hands of law enforcement, but law enforcement is highly represented by the prosecution. They're also, you know , this board is also represented by the defense and you've also got somebody who's , you know , a neutral , uh, judge person. And so, you know, that that sort of is taking it out of the police and giving it to lawyers essentially. Uh, so I'm not sure that that's any better, but I tell you this, I've seen a lot of civilian councils and civilian boards. I don't know . I'm not sure that I would find that , uh, you know, better. I think that it might go the other way. Like every single cop who shows up in front of them might be skewered and, and eliminated and, you know, given the death penalty. So I would like to see how it works out in practice. I'm interested in the idea and some alternative solutions. I do like the idea that it's somebody else investigating the police, not themselves because every time they investigate themselves, it's the damnedest thing. But they find they did nothing wrong. They said , Nope, nothing, nothing happened here. You're good. Get back out there, Joe , go out there. And yeah , for some justice we have Joe Snow says, cops should go back to red sedans and revolvers, no Humvees , bear cats, federal grants for training, pre drug, war, normal human being police officers who aren't trained to believe everyone is a criminal until they're either satisfied or they're not. And they have your next security under their knee. That's from Joe Snow. It's sort of a return to form, you know, go back to civilian policing rather than militaristic policing, where everything is like, you just, you know, have to kick a door down in Fallujah because we're not in Fallujah, we're in America. And in fact, I'm in Scottsdale right now. So why are they treating us like we're in Fallujah, not currently, but you know what I'm saying? From time to time, I represented clients that felt like they were in Fallujah, nothing that warranted, treated like they were in Fallujah. We have it's ed says I was born into poverty. Me to ed. I grew up in the same environment as my brother. I worked hard, never called off, took out student loans to go to school and get my degrees. Now I'm in the top 10%. Well , my brother did the opposite and he's still quote in poverty, equity states. I should distribute my wealth to my brother for social justice. It's just, doesn't seem right. How can anyone that has pulled themselves up by their bootstraps except the idea of equity? I don't know. I think it's a great point. I really don't understand it. And I actually don't understand it from the other perspective. I mean , uh , my story is much the same grew up extremely poor. Uh , told my mom sort of, you know , kind of got her feet under her when I was about in high school. So that entirety, you know, my entire youth was sort of a rough and uh, you know, I, I may do got a scholarship, you know, put myself through college, put myself through law school. Here we are. Now I agree that there's something very powerful about sort of earning something for yourself, going out there saying I got a vision, man. I'm gonna , I'm tired of my circumstances. I'm tired of living in squalor with no money. Wondering if my Bill's going to , uh , you know, my electricity is going to be on when I come home from law school. And that was like, literally the circumstances that I was in, I was working for free for two years. I had no money. So I was catering on the side, long story, the point being there value in that there's value in going through that struggle. I'm extremely grateful for everything that I have. And I wake up every day with some vigor and some energy because I accomplished that and it . I'm not going to let that backslide . I'm proud of everything that I made. I'm proud of what I'm doing in this world. I've got a big mission. I've got a big vision and I want to go accomplish that. Now what I have that if somebody just gave me everything, if somebody just said, oh , well , you know what, kid, you kind of grew up poor. You got a down syndrome, brother , single mom, you've got, you know, got dis disappeared, father. You know, the whole thing was kind of a mess. And now because of your plight, we're going to give you all of this. We're going to give you an education. We're going to give you this. We're going to give you that we're going to give you all this. And what happens to those? What happens to those people? I've seen those people. I know a lot of those people because they're my colleagues out in the legal community. And I'll tell you what little bit of a different way that they conduct themselves in the world. A little bit of a different impact. I think that they're going to leave on the world because they're sort of inwardly focused. They're focused on themselves and their own self-gratification and their own , uh , you know , sort of puffing themselves up and making the world about when you have to go out there and earn it, you realize nobody's going to give you anything. You've got to develop service. You've got to give something to the world. You got to provide more value. And that is really the lesson in that. Not somebody who's out there, just give me everything, give me something. I feel like I'm oppressed. Get out there and make something of yourself and live with the rewards for the rest of your life. So when we talk about this concept of, you know, this, this rebalancing of equity, I understand that not everybody starts at the same starting line. I get that. And I want people to have all of the opportunity in the world, but that comes from removing obstacles, not from putting weights on the shoulders of people who are more successful in society. And it really breaks my heart, that there are a lot of people who are being raised up in America today that don't understand this concept and they're not being taught it. And nobody is preaching about it the way that they should be, because they are going to lose out on one of the most beautiful things about being an American and being alive in this day and age. And it just is a sad thing. Thank you, ed, for that great comment. We have another one from it's ad says, Thomas sole stated based on statistical analysis, the greatest harm to the black community was the destruction of the nuclear family. BLM demands the destruction of the nuclear family, according to their own manifesto, which oddly aligns with Marxists and angles ideologies doesn't seem like BLM really cares about the black community. Well, yeah , I actually agree with that. We have Dr . Renal MD said, did a lawyer prepare that guidance memo. They behave as if BLM is a concept, which it literally can be, but then it refers to it as an organization, seems on point a violation of the hatch act specifically if BLM endorses candidates well BLM on their own website. I mean, they say that they want sort of the removal of a certain political party on their website. We have the, we have the , the list here in the next segment we have it's ed says 607 black people were murdered in Chicago in the last 365 days. Where's BLM for that. Is I a part of the police union? If so, how is that? Not a conflict of interest. Wait , so like it is, but it kind of isn't, you know, it's sort of under the same umbrella. I think it depends on what city you're talking about, but yeah, I mean, there's sort of considered to be , be within the same entity. That's why we , when we talk about civilian or sort of extra party review boards, we're pulling it out of anything that has to do with law enforcement, as it is a conflict of interest. That's the problem. That's why so many people are upset about it and why it needs to change. Great questions really appreciate all the love and the support over from watching the watchers.locals.com. And so we're going to continue on with the same conversation. Black lives matter is still in the news today, of course, is the anniversary of the George Floyd death. We just talked about that in the last segment and we were sort of transitioning into a conversation about BLM and what are they doing? What do they want in this country? And are they being effective in their quest for justice reform? I think the answer is no. I think it's actually been a large failure for the justice reform movement in its entirety, because we had a lot of momentum. We wanted some real meaningful change a year has gone by and nothing has been accomplished. Now, the Democrats themselves who have typically been in alignment with BLM, we're starting to see this rift develop oh, BLM now unhappy with what they're seeing from the Democrats, which were the same people that promised them everything. This last election, this article comes over from business insider written by Camilla Dahal . The chalice, it says inside the police reform rift between BLM activists and the Democrats one year after protests in golf, the nation police reform once brought in a beautiful harmony, the democratic lawmakers and the BLM activist together. Now they're pushing to pass a bipartisan bill. They've left out , uh , attempts to lobby lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. All right. So I want to go through this briefly just to frame out a little bit about sort of the evolution of this back and forth. So we know that BLM has been active in trying to get some real legislation passed. We know that the Democrats promised them the world that they were going to be involved and do all of this, but let's take a look at really how this is unfolding behind the scenes, democratic lawmakers and BLM activists marched together last summer in the aftermath of the Floyd killing that scene , symbolized unity between the two sides, but a year later, activists who propelled the issue of police reform find themselves sidelined. Some BLM activists say that the white house and lawmakers within Congress have continued to shut them out of these negotiations. You don't say crime bill Joe Biden and top cop Kamala Harris don't want to hear from BLM. No kidding. The movement from black lives, a coalition of several organization that advocates the rights of black Americans is one of many groups that have tried to reach out to lawmakers, to hold conversations, but their calls have gone unanswered , uh, uh, a policy and research coordinator for the organization said political backlash. And where is this coming from? Could it have anything to do with defund the police leading the efforts to get a congressional police reform measure? We have two Democrats, Karen Bass , a California and Corey Booker of New Jersey. Tim Scott, the South Carolina Republican is also in the fray. The group acknowledged that they will not make the May 25th deadline, which was today. They need help to succeed. They need 50 Democrats and at least 10 Republicans to get the 60 vote threshold. Now, of course they could. Now of course, that that is true, right? Because you need a more than a simple majority, if it is a nonfinancial bill, but of course, Joe Biden could defund the police with the stroke of a pen, or they could make this a financial bill, this, this, they could make this a budgetary bill, and then they only need a simple majority. So they could just sort of start a defunding different states. They could use the power of the purse, which is within the purview of the house of representatives to control the budgets of different states. And just say, Hey, if you don't, you know, reduce your police force by 25%, we're going to pull back this federal funding that happened like that. No problem. And they have all of the house of representatives that they need to do that. So what they're going to be doing now for the foreseeable future is blaming the Republicans. Well , they're not there . They're not coming across the aisle. We have 51 Democrats, but we need nine Republicans and they're not going to cross because of that qualified immunity thing. All right , Democrats, then table that table to qualified immunity. Let's get everything else that you've promised. Look, I don't even agree with all the solutions. I just say, if you promise this stuff, get it through. Okay. And if you're going to be bloviating about this and justice reform all the time on all, you know, and you'd be parading Floyd's family around all over the place. Well, let's see some action from you shall we we'll see if they do it. So they're going to be blaming the Republicans for the foreseeable future, even though they have other mechanisms by which they could get something done during ACN , CNN interview, James Kleiber and a Democrat for South Carolina, who has been an ardent supporter for police reform suggested that the final bipartisan measure did not include reforms. Oh , did not have to include reforms on qualified immunity. We know what that is. Other elements in the bill are being debated like the federal banning of choke holds requiring police officers to wear body cameras. So Cho Colts I disagree with, I think choke holds absolutely have to be necessary if you don't have a hold folks, if you don't know if you've never wrestled or done mixed martial arts, if you don't, if you can't subdue somebody with the choke hold, the only other alternative is to basically kill them, hit them in the head, knock them unconscious. Cause a concussion caused a laceration, caused a Blaine, a brain bleed, or shoot him or tase him or something like that. Right ? A choke hold if done appropriately, perfectly safe and acceptable. The response to that would be, let's not have cops use not less , less than lethal force and require them to use a gun. Let's just train them how to use the less than lethal force. Better many activists, fear that , uh, sorry on body cameras though. Absolutely. That should be without question. Many activists, fear that the bill lawmakers are considering is watered down, not a true reflection of what activists wants. They say it's been a missed opportunity on the part of folks in the government to not engage very deeply at the grassroots level said Maurice Mitchell Cliburn said that he did not know exactly who ambass has been consulting with on this measure outside of congressional lawmakers, but said she and others should talk with everybody who has knowledge about the subject, the white house, as well as bass Scott and Booker did not respond to the request for a comment. So , uh , we're seeing a lot of the BLM people sort of being kicked out of the conversation and really for good reason. I mean, truthfully, what BLM wants is insane. Here is a list of demands from their website. So they want to convict and ban Donald Trump from political future. So you have a couple of people who are on board with this idea. You got real up rep Ilhan, Omar Presley, Cori Bush, Jamal Bowman, that , that they're all for this. So they want to convict and ban Donald Trump . So if you're a sort of a mainstream Democrat and you're going well, we can't do that. Okay. We tried to convict him in the house of representatives. We got that done. We tried to convict him in the Senate. We didn't convict him. We impeached him. Basically. We indicted him in the house, but we couldn't convict him in the Senate. We tried twice. Can't do it. So do you have any other demands? What else do you want from us folks? We can't do this. So stop asking number two though. Maybe they're good . Maybe they want to talk about justice reform. So the first one had to do with Trump. Maybe number two will have to do with justice. Oh no. It hears, it says expel Republican members of, okay. So there , uh , so nothing to do with law enforcement , uh , nothing to do with anything other than a white supremacist attack on the insurrection. So BLM, if it's a justice reform organization, they're over two , then we have launched a full investigation into the ties between white supremacy , primacy and the Capitol police and law enforcement and the military. So it sounds like they want to sort of fund the police to do an investigation, like, you know, like law enforcement officials to go in and investigate what happened there. So this is also a D a refund, the police type of , uh , idea here. So , uh, there there's zero for three now on justice reform. Then they want to permanently banned Trump from all digital media platforms . So how are they going to do that? Do they have a phone call into Zuckerberg and Dorsey and all of those other people? So we're, we're over four now defund the police. There it is. So when we finally get to something that relates to justice reform, they just want to go ahead and just defund the entire defund , them defund the entire police. Uh, we don't want any more , more of them at all. So , so if you're a democratic lawmaker and you're trying to negotiate in this country about a reasonable justice reform, the solution, what are you supposed to do with that? Why would you even invite them to the table? You can't cause it's ridiculous. Don't let the CU be used as an excuse to crack down on our movement. So I don't even know what they want. Like, I don't know how you deliver that . Like, do we deliver one, you know, one promise of no, no. Cool . All right . And then I want to pass the breathe app . So not even talking about the George Floyd , the chores Floyd back there talking about the breathe act. Police were born out of slave patrols. They say we cannot reform an institution. Built , built upon white supremacy. The breathe act wants racial equity screens and federal programs. We want environmental justice at historic levels, engaging with system impacted communities , uh, you know, health, justice, education, justice, housing, justice, and environmental justice. So nothing at all, other than defunding the police to do with justice. I'm sorry, criminal justice, which is what we were talking about with George Floyd and police that was criminal justice. That was not environmental justice. Now the new times for some reason is confused as to why people are sort of tired of BLM. How could that be? What's the problem what's going on here? Uh , and this story comes over from redstate.com , which is a red blog written over by Nick aroma says the New York times has an opinion piece out. It says support for black lives matter surge last year, did it last? They say, they note how immediately after the death of George Floyd, that support for BLM I'm surged . But then as we notice here, after June 3rd, it took a precipitous drop. As the summer went on, it went down even further than before. The article said that among some voters, even Republicans, it turned out into outright opposition, BLM. During that , see what we told you. The article suggests this drop is of support from white people and Republicans being fickle. They never seem to figure out why it took such a drop after June 3rd, just suggesting that people don't like it when protestors seek a redress of grievances or implying that Republicans and non-supportive voters have issues with civil rights. Right? Do you think it's, do you think it's that if you're listening and you're sort of not a fan of BLM, is it because you have a problem with civil rights, you got an issue with that. Do you have a problem when people readdress their grievances with their government, is that offensive to you mean either nobody cares about it . Those things, the New York times opinion piece says after Floyd's death, Republican's reported much stronger support for BLM than they had earlier in 2020, but perhaps more striking is the rapid decline. Look at the , these numbers net support versus January one, 2020. So we see something happen right here. What's going on ? What's going on here? I don't know what that is, but we'll see the Democrats maintain support. All voters are just trending off going down. Republicans, just a rapid drop off just now . Nope. We've had enough. Thanks for playing. Uh, up until this moment. Even the Republicans, what they saw on that video, they said, all right, this is, this is insane. We want to address this issue. Then something happened . We're up. Thanks for playing. Not, not around anymore. Wonder why they didn't show this graph from the same article, Hispanic or Latino. We have a new addition . That's also dropping off. Oh, and we also have this one from , and the African-American community also dropping off and we have of other also dropping off. They're all going down. Okay? It's not just Republicans. It's all demographics. All ethnicities. Everybody is bailing ship, abandoning ship. What they completely leave never mentioned is the riots, the assaults , the killings, the destruction that occurred over the past year in connection with the protest . Do you think that might've had a little bit to do with the drop afterwards ? June 3rd? How do you write about the decline and never touch upon that? The radical calls to defund the police, which virtually no one, but Democrats supported when the decline showed that yes, BLM , uh, black lives matter to people, which was why there was a brief moment of unity, but then people of all strikes, stripes rejected the violence and the radical nature of BLM. Okay. So you have small letter B L M, and you have capital letter B L M one says yes, black lives matter. Of course, the other is this neo-Marxist anti justice movement that just enriches they're founders with new houses. But of course the New York times wanted to suggest it was uncaring, white people and Republicans without leaving out all the destruction. The article notes that white Democrats were still supporting BLM, which they take as a positive movement. So they're basically confirming the Democrats are ignorant, is what he said or went on, or they were cool with the destruction. If they agree with the radical nature is that it's true. Democrats like Biden and Kamala embraced BLM, Kamala, even donated to a bail fund during the riots. Remember that she posted that up same day in Minneapolis after they torched the third police precinct there burnt it to the ground. She's up on Twitter, Kamala Harris on Twitter, Hey, anybody who is arrested, they're just going to go to this website and you can support their bail fund. So that's nice that she really supports justice out there. Does she support bail reform? Wonder if she donated any money to those Capitol hill rioters or nuts, guessing nuts. New York times doesn't believe that the opposition to BLM is likely to reverse anytime soon. Right? Of course not. So on Twitter, somebody said, I wonder maybe this could be what caused it. Could it be pictures like this torching and Arby's is this, is this justice. Maybe that might be why those numbers drop off because people are tired of seeing their neighborhoods torched. It's not okay. People don't want to see cops killing people. They also don't want to see their neighborhoods towards . So if they want to work on their public image, little bit of a suggestion to stop torching neighborhoods might be a good idea. Now, you know, the , the, the problem might be more fundamental than this. It might be something that starts at the top. You know, they say leadership starts at the top. You sort of set the culture at the top and you want those people to be very strong, natured, very powerful people who are gonna move the needle on whatever you're working on. And , uh , the BLM labor Ola , the founder, the BLM founder actually says that police are a terrorist organization. So it says she always wanted to fight them. So the remarks came over from a speech at Kings college in London, part of a Ferguson solidarity tour callers , who is the BLM founder reveals that her activism is rooted in a lifelong desire to quote , fight the police conflates the group to a terrorist organization. And I'm a criminal defense lawyer. K , my job is to go and sort of work against the police. So I've got, you know, sort of spring loaded to say that there are problems with the police. I would never call them a terrorist organization. What's a terrorist organization. Like I joined when I was 17. She said, I remember the first thing I said, do you fight the police? That's what I wanted to do. I always knew I wanted to fight police. They were the single most sort of terrorist organization in my life. And I wanted to know how to fight them. Uh, I am a person who fights the police, but I do not consider them a terrorist organization. I consider them to be a legitimate function of society. They need to be counterbalanced properly by a strong defense. We have the scales of justice, but I don't when I walk into court and there was a police officer on the stand, I don't think that that's Al Qaeda going to blow up the building. It's just a police officer. He's doing his job. And 99% of them are , are great people. So I started doing work when I was 17 years old against the police. She adds before detailing how she ran campaigns that focused on trying to get them out of high schools, ran campaigns that focused on decriminalizing young people's lives. So I can, I can get behind that. That's fine colors . Also conflates police to terrorists when describing the motives of BLM, alleging her group seeks to combat the impact that racism, that terrorism. And I say, terrorism, I'm talking about the police has on our lives. So, you know, this is just, oh my gosh, this is just a quick point here. But because like, how do you , how do you engage in a real dialogue with this person? How do you have a conversation if this is how this person thinks? And, and doesn't just like, this is not a new position. This person has been thinking this since she was 17 years old, her entire framework for how law enforcement works in America is sort of a victim population versus a terrorist organization. And she's confirmed that twice. Now, two sentences, actually twice, three, three times in two sentences, twice in the same sentence. So if you're on, if you're on the side of, let's have a reasonable conversation about law enforcement in America, and you're trying to have on the other side of the table, a conversation with somebody that says the police are actual terrorists, what do you do? Do you have that conversation? No. You get up and leave. You just say, we're done. We're done here. Uh , go , go ahead. Continue your work on fighting terrorism in America. And , uh, I'll do my work. Thanks for playing I'm out during the event, which was hosted by student groups in coot , including action, Palestine, the intersectional feminist society, the African Caribbean society and the Kings ethnic minority association. Oh my gosh. That is just one of the most perfect sentences I've ever read on this show. We have action Palestine. We have the intersectional feminist society. We have the African Caribbean society. Then we have the Kings ethnic minority association along with black lives matter. Oh my goodness. In response to the Ferguson riots colors recounted how it prompted many of us to go back into our known , known our own neighborhoods and shut down. She said, one of the biggest things I learned about Ferguson is this not take 2000 people to shut stuff down. Five people can shut a freeway down. We did it in LA 10. People can shut a Walmart down. We did it in Ferguson. She also talks about occupying the LAPD headquarters. She said, we've been shutting us down since August 9th. We're still shutting it down in LA. For example, we occupied Los Angeles police headquarters for 18 days. They occupied the Los Angeles police headquarters 18 days . Is that, was that an insurrection that I miss that one because it sounds like they're interfering with formal government operations. I mean, the police are an extension of the government. It's a government entity and they're interfering with they occupied the headquarters for 18 days . Did you hear about this? I didn't hear about this. I wonder where, where all the impeachment articles are. Are they being drafted by Nancy Pelosi and her crew doubtful this unearth video that follows, we're going to play this next to shows colors , relishing people comparing her work for its similarities to former Chinese communist party. Mousay dunk his little red books in a 2010 speech quote. I was speaking to this young person from Arizona. Who's trying to fight SB 10 70, which was that immigration bill we had here. And he grabbed a book and he said, it's like, Mao's red book. And I was like, man, that's what I was thinking. And it was just really cool to hear him make that connection. And I was like, how about you buy 10 to 15 of these books? And you'll have all like a youth organizing group where you talk about it and you really try to engage this. The BLM co-founder commented. And here she is. I joined

Speaker 5:

The organization when I was 17 years old. And I remember the first thing I said to the organization , uh, was, do you fight police? That's what I wanted to do. I always knew I wanted to fight police there, that they were the same. They were the single most , um , sort of terrorist organization and then my life. And I want to know how to fight them. I want to know how to keep them accountable and accountable. Um , so I started doing , uh , work without 17 years old, the police and , uh, from there , uh, the different sorts of thing, ran campaigns that focused on trying to get them out of high schools, ran a campaign that focused on teens , criminalizing , um , young people's lives.

Speaker 1:

All right , take a look up here. You can see this says no more deaths up here. No more coverups , no more something. So we have all of the organizations. We have the action Palestine. We saw those all listed there. So in a nice little setup here, I mean, this is a big, big production. They're going to be recording this and it'll make it making a documentary out of it or something. So, all right. Let's take some questions over from watching the watchers.locals.com . We got Joe Snow first up says blaming Republicans. Now that's a novel idea. Yeah, they are definitely doing that. Gonna milk that one for awhile and why renal MD says, I think qualified immunity needs an overhaul. We have legal tests for causes of action, slander libel make a legal test. So it's at least possible to file a lawsuit. I agree. So I actually agree with that. I think the qualified immunity absolutely does need to be addressed. My only sort of a rub here is that if we're going to make that the basis or the crux of an entire criminal justice bill, there's still a lot of other things we can do. So it's all right. If the whole thing is going to fail, meaning we just, we just had one of the most monumental criminal justice cases that we've, we may have in our lifetimes. I mean, truthfully, what happened with George Floyd and the response there? It's kind of a once in a century thing, right? I mean, if we were ever had anything like that before, not quite to that extent, we've had Rodney king, we had , um, uh, OJ, of course, you know, we've had the Zimmermans and all of those, but not quite anything I think at this scale. So something like this happens and we have all of the momentum to pass something meaningful, and we're just going to stop because qualified immunity, that's it. You got to the basis or at least a good argument for the basis as to why the Democrats elected in the first place was because it was sort of in the, in the throws of all this, of all this social unrest and racial impropriety or, or, or disparities that are happening around the country. So if the Democrats now take control of the white house, the Senate and the house of representatives and they don't get anything done and they just go, oh, well, those Republicans, we wanted qualified immunity in there, but they wouldn't give it to us. So we're going to blame them for stalling, the entire package we're going to , we're going to there , it's their fault. Give me a break. So you just say, all right, well, we're going to give that up. We're going to pass all of this other stuff. The stuff that we have been promising to our constituents for a long time. We'll see if that happens though, not holding my breath. Renal says public support for some of the qualified immunity reform. Democrats are likely riding on the controversy. Yeah. Peace tranquility is not the environment where they thrive politically. Right. Right, exactly. Right. This is great. So, so what happens if the Democrats pass all of this stuff and what happens if something else happens down the road, what are they going to complain about? What do you know, what are they going to be able to do? Because if the Democrats pass and here, then they're going to own it for the foreseeable future. So they kind of really don't have much interest in that because if they solve this issue, while they , they deflate a lot of the momentum in the sales, that's behind them at the current moment, I know that's very cynical, but I think it's true. Cho colds matter, working security in downtown Chicago to help pay for school Choco it's helped me keep peace on more than a dozen occasions. Yeah. And that comes from it's ed he's right, right . It is right. So choke holds are , are important. I mean, the other thing you can do is just bash somebody over the head or shoot them. I guess we have Joe Snow says you must have never had to tell a cop. No, don't know what that is in reference to, I mean, I've told cops know a lot, but in the context of the law, I can't say that I've ever been pulled over and a cop gave me an order. And I said, no, but of course I would not have a problem with that if it was an unlawful order, but I know that other people may not have that same perspective. Right. And so that's why we're going to be talking about how to talk to cops on Saturday, June 12th, if you're a subscriber, watching the watchers.locals.com , you're going to get to be a part of that. And then Joe Snow, we're going to talk about how to talk to the cops, Sharon Quinn . He says they are not interested in a conversation. All they are interested in is replacing the constitution, which they advertise as racist with a totalitarian Marxist dictatorship. I think that you're on the right track there. Sharon Jeremy says anyone with half a brain can define the verb to police. Even if you define one who enforces law is not a terrorist by definition, ignorance of reality only makes one appear crazy. These people are claiming to be combating terrorism, but are terrorists themselves by definition. Ooh, that's good. I like that. Jeremy. Well done. We have another one from Joe. Snow says to be honest, I don't entirely disagree that today's police absolutely terrorized people for sport. I don't consider them a terrorist organization, but many individual officers are terrorists because they truly are some of the most disgusting sociopath's walking. A mana among us. I've dealt with many, growing up one or two were decent people. One was stellar. All the rest were absolutely predators who take joy in ruining lives. It's an interesting perspective. And you know, I mean to be, to be, to be fair to that point, right? There are officers who are, who do terrorize people. There's no question about that. Uh, I think some of it is, is, is justified. Okay . If you're sort of in a , in an , in a, in a situation where allegedly you're breaking the law and you need somebody to say you're breaking the law. So there's a boundary that's being crossed. Anytime you cross any boundary, you're going to have some friction there. And especially when you're talking about laws in society, you're, you're sort of breaching something. You're going to have police. When you meet in the middle there, it's going to be contentious. And if you're not somebody that's familiar with dealing with police, yeah . It's going to feel like, like you're being terrorized. And some of those situations, even though that the person sort of the defendant or the person who's being charged with a crime, even though they may feel subjectively terrorized, that feeling alone does not make what the police did, unreasonable or unlawful or even wrong in any capacity, as long as they're following the rules, as long as they're following the laws, the fact that somebody feels terrorized, it's , that's part of the deal. Okay. That's just part of the , of society. Now, there are other situations of course, and I've dealt with many of them where the police have no lawful authority or, or are , or exceeding their lawful authority. And they're becoming inhumane to certain people outside of the context of what should be allowed. And I think that in those cases, of course, those are those bad cops I talk about. And I'm very upset with those cops. I started an entire YouTube channel about it, and I like to call those officers out and make sure that they're held accountable. But just because that there is, you know , one bucket of those people, it doesn't necessarily mean that all the officers are bad. I think that, you know, there's, there's sort of a cultural problem with law enforcement where a lot of the good officers are not encouraged or given a forum where they can speak up and call out some of the problems that they see. And so when I , when I talk about law enforcement in that, in that context, I think that there is a cultural problem that permeates the entire sector. That being said, I still believe that within that shell, that most of the officers in there, at least in my experience, I've dealt with many of them. I think that they're mostly good people , uh, not, not generally friendly. Okay. They don't typically like to see me. We don't go out and shake hands and say hi, but reasonable people, people that I can tell are doing their best, doing a job, you know, they've got other things going on in their lives, just like you do, just like I do. And they're just trying to do a good job. And, you know, they don't, they don't necessarily like to go in and sort of get , get beat up by a defense attorney. And we don't like to do that either. So it's , it's just one of the things that, you know, we're , we're all human beings. We have all sorts of different permutations about what makes us human. And we're trying to negotiate and reach a consensus in the middle. That is , is reasonable. So when I , I think that when we go too far, one direction, either way, we , we can get some, we can get a little bit blinded by our own cognitive biases. And I recognize that myself, I am generally on that side, I'm like over here going, oh, these cops and these prosecutors, you know, and I can recognize that in myself, but I also recognize that there's a bit of a blind spot. And so I try to kind of pull myself back in over here and be empathetic to police. Many of whom I think are , are just trying to do their best out there. So thank you for the perspective, Joe Snow . Appreciate your comments. Thanks for being here. And that's it for that segment. We're going to wrap up. We're going to keep talking about Floyd in a little bit of a different context. Back last year after George Floyd was killed, we know that the entire country was up in arms about it. And many people were demanding action and change, including many CEOs and corporations. Now that a year has passed, the question is, did they make good on their promises? Did all of those pledges come to fruition? We're going to take a look at an article from the financial times that says are CEOs living up to the pledges they made after George Floyd's murder promises were made about diversity and about racial justice. Well , those are approved, easier to make than they are to keep isn't that convenient. So here's another picture of George Floyd. This article was written by Andrew Edgecliff Johnson and Taylor Nicole's Rogers down here from the financial times, go give them a subscription. If you like the content, the words systemic racism use to not be spoken on us companies , earnings calls. Okay. So think about this. You work at a private corporation or a , a public corporation or a private business, or whatever. The way that we're talking about interfacing with other people has changed dramatically. I'm going to talk to you here about a couple of different charts, sort of what is the consequence of everything that we went through the last year in our corporate worlds. We talked about this in the context of criminal law. We talked about this in the context of justice reform and our useless politicians. Now we're talking about this in terms of society and how has this all trickling down into our culture and into our daily lives. Even in our workplaces, we remember we've seen a lot of this stuff come to fruition. In this context, talking about diversity, the murder of George Floyd, a black man killed by Shovan abruptly changed that, putting the phrase into the mouth of the country's top executives and forcing them to consider their part in a system. They're now denouncing. We have Apple's Tim cook. We have Dave Solomon of Goldman Sachs. They declared that business leaders need not only speak up, but they , you need to do more to address racial disparities in their own companies and assessment of the changes they have made in the intervening period suggest that Floyd's death did catalyze corporate diversity equity and inclusion efforts, but on several key measures, much more needs to be done, including to turn executives, newly active rhetoric into a reality American corporations. They pledged to spend $50 billion on racial equity. And you remember this, right? We remember we, we we've seen sort of a slow transition here. We saw a lot of this start with , uh , Colin Kaepernick. Then we saw Nike sort of go all in on that message. We've seen Coca-Cola people were joking. They're called WOCA Cola. Yeah . And so the list goes on and on you see boycotts and you see a lot of corporations sort of jumping into the political fray, leaving many of us to go let's all right, we're going to, we're going to get political now with the corporations, we're going to see how that works. But , uh , $50 billion is a significant amount of money. The funds were to be spread between donations to civil rights organizations and targeted investments in communities of color and overhauls of their internal recruiting and training programs. Yet only about 250 million has actually been spent or committed 250 million at a 50 billion. Okay. Tiny little fraction, 50 billions , a lot of money. This is what the vocabulary looks like. This is what happened. Remember this happened May 25th, right? About this time George Floyd changed how corporate America speaks changed the vocabulary mentions of systemic racism and black lives matter at company events. This is what happened. This is the , the pink here is BLM. So soon as Doris Floyd died, major spike, and it's been flowing ever since same here with systemic racism, boom , all over the place, spiking up still around and in existence. Now the question is, you know, is this, is this doing much of anything? Is this just a bunch of people just talking about making some meaningful changes about creating some equity or equality? Or is this just a bunch of bloviating from corporate chills as is usually the case? Well, we know that employers are happy talking about some things, but not other things. Let's see if we can dissect why that might be. So from this same article, it says that employers are happier disclosing anti-biased training than they are about pay. So if they're talking about, you know, about, we've got, we've got a very unequal society in America, we're all a bunch of racist, white patriarchs that were birthed emerged from original sin tainted by the stink of slavery back in the 16 hundreds when America started to get its feet under herself. So how do we correct that problem? I'm a fortune 500 CEO. I know what a piece of garbage I am. I got to fix the scales in America. What do I do? Well, I can do one thing I can just give everybody raises. I can just say, well, you know, we've been pretty racist here at this country for the last 50 years. So we're going to just go ahead and, and give some version of reparations or something. We're going to give the, the, the plighted people benefits in the forms of monetary compensation. It's one way to do it, right? And these corporations could do that. Do they want to do that? No, of course not. They don't want to do any of that. They want to talk about education and training programs. Okay. So employers are happier disclosing anti-biased training plans than they are paid. Oh , they don't want to talk about pay equity. That's down here at the bottom. Nobody wants to talk about that, but we can talk about education and training programs. We can talk about community investments, because first of all, we know that we're not going to have to make any of those. We pledged 50 billion where we only gave 250 million. So you're all a bunch of suckers who printed that. So we're just going to say this a lot. And we know that we're only going to have to deliver about this much of it. Then we've got a racial and ethnic diversity data. So that's easy for them. They just go to their HR department and we just run some numbers up. We've got some in a low numbers over here, so we're going to beef that up. So that causes really, they don't do anything about that. Then a response to mass incarceration. So what are these companies going to do about any of that? Nothing. They're just going to kick it over to the politicians who are also not going to do anything about it. And so they can just talk about this all day long. So most of these are actually just totally meaningless. They don't do anything, but they can talk about it and they can pledge a bunch of money and they can sort of cause some incense division in this country by puffing up a bunch of , uh, politically volatile stories that make them sort of feel good about themselves without actually doing anything meaningful to rectify some of the imbalances that they're claiming exists. Now I'm not buying any of their premises. I don't believe the premises, but they're their premises. I mean, they're the people who came out and said this well, we were going to commit 50 billion to , uh , uh , solving racial disparity in this country. Okay. Well, where is your money? Well, it's a good question. What we want to focus on is education and training programs. Oh, okay. And community investments. Got it. Good for you. It's a nice grift. Very, very nice grift. A few of these platforms have used their power more forcefully. We have an economist, who's the director of 3m and Chevron. So she said we are demanding much more responsibility and accountability around subcontractors. So she said the company she works for we're scrutinizing scrutinizing whether accountants law firms and head hunters were sufficiently diverse. Listen to this. This is, this is great. Coca Cola went public with the demand in January. They told us law firms that they must commit within 18 months to having at least 30% of their billable hours be from diverse attorneys. Half of whom must be black. So Coca Cola calls up our law firm and says, Hey guys , um, well, we don't want you to working on our stuff not anymore . Um , unless a third of your office is black. So no , I'm not going to share with you the demographics of our firm, of course. But if we didn't have that or if we needed to get that, then what would we do? I guess we would just fire some white people and go find some black people so that we could stay, keep a client called Coca-Cola . If that, if they were our client, like, is that what they're asking law firms to do? Go fire the white folks at your firm, go hire some black people because we're not going to do business with you unless you do that. Okay. That's Coke. If they want to do that, I guess, I guess they're entitled. That sounds racist as hell to me, but what do I know on current trends? Black lawyers could not expect to be equitably represented among law for partners until 2391 said Cokes general counsel at the time. So they're going to fix that. He said, we have developed scorecards. We've held summits established committees. We've written action plans. These efforts are not working weeks after sending the letter and just eight months into his job. However, Gaden had stepped back into a consulting role, poor idiot. He has no idea what he's doing asks whether Gayden's diversity demand remained in place. The company said only that his successor would take time to thoughtfully review its initiatives. So the guy, the guy sends this letter and he to a bunch of law firms and you have a bunch of lawyers go, oh, no, that sounds like discrimination. To me, it sounds like that might be a little a violation of the equal protection rules under the employment discrimination act. And you've got all these employment lawyers going, oh , this'll be fun. So , uh, not a good decision to sort of send a racist , uh , a bunch of law firms that have a bunch of lawyers who know how the law works, not going to work out for you when you do that. So that guy got promoted and went right back down to a consultant. We thanks for the consultation. We're not going to be needing anymore that , so it's just, oh my gosh, kind of why I have so much fun with this topic. It's like, it's such a ridiculous thing. You know, these people who think this way and operate this way and try to act this way, it doesn't work. They're going to run themselves into different circles. And they're just going to explode under the weight of their own idiocy. It's like a black hole collapsing in on itself. There's just so much bad idea happening. Yeah . One vicinity, it's just, oh , it's just going to collapse in on itself, which is fine. That means we just have to sit here and watch as this whole thing crumbles before our very eyes. Now we also know that the , uh, the F the feds are trying to get involved in some of this as well. So we're talking about corporations like Coke and , uh, you know, the NFL and the NBA and all of these big major organizations, but our federal government now is also , uh , kind of in inserting our money into this conversation. Very strange. We see this article here published over from Fox news Fox business. It says that the wokeness at the feds , regional banks puts central bank independence at risk. So what does wokeness and racial justice and equity this stuff has to do with the federal reserve banks? Well, regional banks are taking any , uh , taking an increasingly alarming stance on politically charged issues like racial justice. According to Senator pat Toomey, a Republican from Pennsylvania, federal reserve banks in Atlanta, Boston, Minneapolis, recently dedicated resources to social policy, reflecting the political leanings of officials who are neither elected nor confirmed by the Senate federal Reserve's mission statement mandates that the central bank to achieve maximum employment and stable prices experience has shown that countries with independent banks achieve better outcomes. Yeah. Pursuing a highly politicized social agenda, unrelated to monetary policy is inflicting reputational damage. The banks said Senator to me, three banks recently spearheaded a series that will be participated in all 12 regional banks, which is centered on the belief that racism forms the foundation of inequality in our society. The re the racism and economy series highlighted a number of topics, including structural racism in housing education and label markets. Atlanta fed president, who was the first black fed president on Monday, said that should he become fed chairman? He would steer the central bank towards economic inclusivity and equity. Can you believe this? The federal reserve chairman is going to push the federal reserve bank towards economic inclusivity and equity folks. That is code word for like Marxism exactly right there, which is scary. Earlier this year, he said that we, there are definitely merits to reparations and called the changes to Georgia voting laws troubling that came last year after he published a letter, said a moral and economic imperative to end racism. So this guy is just a Stone's throw away from the, from the fed chair, Minneapolis fed meanwhile in 2020 renewed its commitment to dismantling systemic racism said that that the, the deaths of George Floyd and Briana Taylor, where the racist roots of the country, to me asked all three banks to provide documents on their recent racial justice activism. Good for him. Good for Senator to me for getting that stuff. It says it falls outside their scope no later than June 7th. Good for him. Hats off the Senator. To me, they said we received an inquiry from Toomey's office about better understanding how we were using racial inequality with the federal reserve spokesman. For both of them declined to comment the politicization of this and the so-called woke ism has been seeping into governmental departments, corporate boardrooms and universities across America. Biden pushes the plan to combat systemic racism, which is a stain on our nation soul . He says Biden later said he doesn't think that American people are racist. That's good. White house has said that Biden would S the white house has not said if Biden would sign a reparations bill, should one pass through Congress. Well, maybe somebody should ask him, would you sign that, Joe? Yes or no. We got to move quickly through these questions. Doctor says recently, senators presented amendments to put baseball's anti-trust status with the federal government MLB claim that the George's legislation clearing up the voting laws after 2020, it was racist. Since these corporations are political. Now they should no longer enjoy specialty treatment . I agree with that. If they're going to be political, we should treat them the same way as we do all political organizations. Sharon Quinny says in all this talk about BLM racial equity, trying to outwork each other, the corporations are just taking out a form of insurance against vandalism and future repercussions. In the event of a Marxist takeover, we have [inaudible] says, you know, what is even more worthless than paying for all these woke programs, carbon credits. These things are the biggest con on the planet. Once you look into it for more than five minutes. Yeah. There's a lot of that going on. So the feds are now getting into called in this, this woke is in game, which means it might be a good idea to just kind of maybe think about some alternative currencies, which by the way, I have a new crypto channel, which is down below, let's take a quick look at the freedom markets. These are the freedom indices, because they're , there's no wokeness going on here. Bitcoin is kind of hovering around 37,000. We've got the Ethereum's about 2,600, no , no real major changes. You can see still on a nut trend, really in all of these markets, we've got the car. Dano is looking pretty good. Buck 59. Right now we have Solano is doing well. Also that's about $30. This has been trending down all day. So, you know , it might be worth, worth taking a look at, we have , uh , ICP, which I just made a video about this one down here. So ICP, very interesting protocol. I made a video on the crypto channel about this protocol specifically. It's it's, this is supposed to replace the entire internet , uh, at some point in the future. And it looks like we've got some little bullet get a little bit of , of a upswing right there. We got doge coin is in the house that is still falling. We've got Shiba Inu, which is the another meme coin. And we have light coin, which is a staple. So, you know, if the fed is going to be going, whoa , there are other ways where you can spend your time that don't involve woke American dollars, put them in crypto. And all those questions came over from watching the watchers.locals.com . You can see this here. Welcome to Lonnie Holcomb . Welcome to the community. My friend, I'm glad that you are here and with us. And if you are not already a part of the community, you can join up and you can get a copy of my book for free. It's called beginning to winning, how to fight your case and succeed in the criminal justice system. You can also download a copy of the slides that we went through today. A copy of my impeachment party documents download my personal productivity system called existence systems. We share links throughout the day and you meet a lot of great people. We met a lot of great people on our last monthly zoom meetup . We have about 35 people on super fun. Want to show you when our next one is, we had our last one on May 22nd, which was last weekend. Next one's coming up June 26. If you're a [email protected] , you get in on that for free, no charge. You also get the chance or the , the, the it's it's free. Just need you to come to it. It's on Saturday, June 12th, we're doing law enforcement interaction training. So we're gonna spend about an hour and a half talking about how this all works, and then we'll take some questions and just kind of hang out for the last half hour. We spent two hours Saturday morning for me, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM or 12 noon Eastern time for those of you on the east coast. And one last thing, I happened to be a criminal defense lawyer in Scottsdale Arizona. So if you know anybody in the state of Arizona who has been charged with a crime, we would be honored and humbled. If you sent them our direction, we offer free case evaluations. We can help with any type of criminal charge, even traffic charges. We can help with any time that you're in trouble with the law, we are the people to call. And so we would really appreciate your referrals and any love that you send our way. All of the contact information is down in the link in the description below quick reminder, if you're watching this and you're not subscribed to this channel, go ahead and subscribe. We would love to see you here back , uh, on future shows. I have a list of some of the other channels where some of my other content is now coming out. So if you're interested in that, I'd encourage you to go check those out as well as many of you know, YouTube has not been nice to us on this channel. And so , um, we're sort of diversifying a little bit and segmenting the content out. So if you want to follow along, that's the place to do that. And then , uh, that is it. My friends were going to be back here. Same time, same place tomorrow, 4:00 PM, Arizona time, 5:00 PM, mountain 6:00 PM. Central 7:00 PM on the east coast for that one, Florida man, everybody have a tremendously lovely evening sleep very well. I'll see you here tomorrow. Bye bye .