Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.

Chauvin Verdict Aftermath, Ma'Khia Bryant Shooting, #BadPopo Ofc. Julian Navarrette DUI Stop

April 22, 2021 Robert Gruler Esq.
Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.
Chauvin Verdict Aftermath, Ma'Khia Bryant Shooting, #BadPopo Ofc. Julian Navarrette DUI Stop
Chapters
Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.
Chauvin Verdict Aftermath, Ma'Khia Bryant Shooting, #BadPopo Ofc. Julian Navarrette DUI Stop
Apr 22, 2021
Robert Gruler Esq.

Tears of joy and excitement as people flood the streets to celebrate the convictions in the Derek #ChauvinTrial. New claims of racism in yet another police shooting involving 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant. Bad Popo Deputy Julian Navarrette caught on body camera trying to talk his way out of a DUI. And more! Join criminal defense lawyer Robert F. Gruler in a discussion on the latest legal, criminal and political news, including:

• Cheers ring out in corners of America as Derek Chauvin is convicted on all 3 charges in the killing of George Floyd.
• A look inside Oak Park Heights, the prison facility where Derek Chauvin will be staying.
• A review of the final moments of Chauvin trial and what Derek Chauvin wrote on his hand prior to being remanded into custody.
• George Floyd’s family reacts and celebrates the verdict.
• President Biden uses the occasion to say we cannot stop here on criminal justice reform.
• New Attorney General Merrick Garland releases a brief statement on the verdict.
• Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez declares this verdict is not justice.
• Nancy Pelosi thanks George Floyd for dying to help the criminal justice reform movement.
• In another officer involved shooting, 16-year-old #MaKhiaBryant was killed in an altercation with police.
• Ma'Khia Bryant was seen attempting to stab another woman when officer Nicholas Reardon opened fire, killing Bryant.
• Protests formed last night and many in the media are already critical of the shooting, calling it premature.
• Ben Crump, the NAACP and others respond, characterizing the Ma'Khia Bryant shooting as another racist cop killing.
• Body camera footage from an Arizona Sheriff’s deputy shows an officer trying to get out of a DUI.
• Deputy Julian Navarette with the Pinal Sheriff’s Office is seen on camera trying to talk his way out of a DUI conviction.
• Deputy Navarette uses racial slurs and begs the arresting officer to let him go or risk jeopardizing his career.
• Your questions from Locals.com after each segment!

LIVECHAT QUESTIONS: 
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• Homepage with transcripts (under construction): https://www.watchingthewatchers.tv

Don't forget to join us on Locals! https://watchingthewatchers.locals.com

Why Locals? We head over to Locals to continue the conversation before, during and after the show. You can also grab the slides (and other stuff) from the show as well as a free PDF copy of Robert’s book which is also available to buy on Amazon here: https://rcl.ink/hHB

Other tips? Send to [email protected] or tag @RobertGrulerEsq on twitter.

#WatchingtheWatchers #DerekChauvin #ChauvinTrial #GeorgeFloyd #Chauvin #Floyd #Guilty #MaKhiaBryant #SayHerName #BadPopo #JulianNavarrette

Show Notes Transcript

Tears of joy and excitement as people flood the streets to celebrate the convictions in the Derek #ChauvinTrial. New claims of racism in yet another police shooting involving 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant. Bad Popo Deputy Julian Navarrette caught on body camera trying to talk his way out of a DUI. And more! Join criminal defense lawyer Robert F. Gruler in a discussion on the latest legal, criminal and political news, including:

• Cheers ring out in corners of America as Derek Chauvin is convicted on all 3 charges in the killing of George Floyd.
• A look inside Oak Park Heights, the prison facility where Derek Chauvin will be staying.
• A review of the final moments of Chauvin trial and what Derek Chauvin wrote on his hand prior to being remanded into custody.
• George Floyd’s family reacts and celebrates the verdict.
• President Biden uses the occasion to say we cannot stop here on criminal justice reform.
• New Attorney General Merrick Garland releases a brief statement on the verdict.
• Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez declares this verdict is not justice.
• Nancy Pelosi thanks George Floyd for dying to help the criminal justice reform movement.
• In another officer involved shooting, 16-year-old #MaKhiaBryant was killed in an altercation with police.
• Ma'Khia Bryant was seen attempting to stab another woman when officer Nicholas Reardon opened fire, killing Bryant.
• Protests formed last night and many in the media are already critical of the shooting, calling it premature.
• Ben Crump, the NAACP and others respond, characterizing the Ma'Khia Bryant shooting as another racist cop killing.
• Body camera footage from an Arizona Sheriff’s deputy shows an officer trying to get out of a DUI.
• Deputy Julian Navarette with the Pinal Sheriff’s Office is seen on camera trying to talk his way out of a DUI conviction.
• Deputy Navarette uses racial slurs and begs the arresting officer to let him go or risk jeopardizing his career.
• Your questions from Locals.com after each segment!

LIVECHAT QUESTIONS: 
• https://watchingthewatchers.locals.com/

NEW! EXISTENCE SYSTEMS ONLINE COURSE!
• www.existencesystems.com

Connect with us:
• Locals! https://watchingthewatchers.locals.com
• Podcast (audio): https://watchingthewatchers.buzzsprout.com/
• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robertgruleresq
• Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/RobertGrulerEsq
• Robert Gruler Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/RobertGrulerEsq/
• Miss Faith Instagram https://www.instagram.com/faithie_joy/
• Clubhouse: @RobertGrulerEsq @faith_joy
• Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/robertgruleresq
• Homepage with transcripts (under construction): https://www.watchingthewatchers.tv

Don't forget to join us on Locals! https://watchingthewatchers.locals.com

Why Locals? We head over to Locals to continue the conversation before, during and after the show. You can also grab the slides (and other stuff) from the show as well as a free PDF copy of Robert’s book which is also available to buy on Amazon here: https://rcl.ink/hHB

Other tips? Send to [email protected] or tag @RobertGrulerEsq on twitter.

#WatchingtheWatchers #DerekChauvin #ChauvinTrial #GeorgeFloyd #Chauvin #Floyd #Guilty #MaKhiaBryant #SayHerName #BadPopo #JulianNavarrette

Speaker 1:

Hello, my friends. And welcome back to yet. Another episode of watching the Watchers live. My name is Robert ruler. I am a criminal defense attorney here at the R and R law group in the always beautiful and sunny Scottsdale Arizona, where my team and I over the course of many years have represented thousands of good people facing criminal charges. And throughout our time in practice, we have seen a lot of problems with our justice system. I'm talking about misconduct involving the police. We have prosecutors behaving poorly. We have judges not particularly interested in a little thing called justice, and it all starts with the politicians, the people at the top, the ones who write the rules and pass the laws that they expect you and me to follow, but sometimes have a little bit of difficulty doing so themselves. That's why we started this show called watching the Watchers so that together with your help, we can shine that big, beautiful spotlight of accountability and transparency back down upon our very system with a hope of finding justice. And we're grateful that you are here and with us today, we've got some of the Derrick Shovan aftermath that we've got to get to. We've got some reaction, of course, from George Floyd and his fans , not George Floyd , but George Floyd's family, his brother felonies , nays , and others. We've got Ben Crump who has sort of been out there a very celebratory about the verdict and about the three convictions that Derek Shovan is now , uh , facing. So we've got a lot to break down there . President Biden weighed in on this attorney, general Merrick Garland brought this forward. Nancy Pelosi yesterday is even thankful that George Florida is no longer with us. She's pretty, you know , happy that that he's not here because of all the good stuff that is coming as a result of his death. We also have AOC. Who's not happy about this. So while a lot of other individuals are thrilled that Derek Shovan was convicted on all three counts AOC, and some others are not particularly happy about it. So we've got a little bit of stuff we got to get through on the Shovan analysis. Then we're going to change gears because before we even finished talking about Derek Shovan, there was yet another police shooting. And this one's a little bit different yesterday as we were getting , uh , I actually, I think as we were on the live stream, there was murmurings that a new shooting, new protests were developing surrounding the young woman named Macchia Bryant, who was 16 years old shot and killed out of Columbus, Ohio. And so this is an interesting case, you know, everybody's sort of spring loaded now to pick a justice issue, to pick any particular problem that crops up in our justice system and pick a side, right? Whether it's Rittenhouse or Shovan or now Bryant , everybody wants to sort of find a team and join that team quickly and then sort of make a situation into something that it really isn't. And so that happened to a degree that was kind of shocking yesterday because when we really dive into the Macchia Bryant case, I think it's pretty obvious what happened here and that the shooting was in fact necessary, but still a lot of people don't see it that way. So we've got to break that down. Then we got to talk about, it's been a long time folks since we had a little bad Popo segment on this channel, but we've got one, we've got a bad, bad Popo here in the state of Arizona, actually guy by the name of Juliet nav already , still part of the Pinel County Sheriff's office was picked up for a DUI very recently, tried to talk his way out of it a little bit. It didn't work out for him. Of course, he still got charged. NBC news got a copy of the body camera on . So we're going to go through some of that today. So we've got a bad Popo and we have a good Popo because the arresting officer there said, Hey man, what are you, what are you doing? You shouldn't even be a cop based on the fact that you're trying to get out of this thing. You are not fit for the job he said, or something like that. So we've got a bad Popo and a very good Popo. And we're going to talk about both of those today, wanting to invite you to be a part of the show, because we do take questions in between those different segments. We've got a lot to talk about. Of course you have opinions on those and you've got some insight you want to share. You've got some comments or even some criticisms you want to lob our way. The place to do that is [email protected] We have a community there called watching the Watchers, and it's a little bit of a , of a area where we all congregate. We share links throughout the day. We comments , we engage with one another and have good conversations and we ask questions over there. So there's a live chat happening right [email protected] where ask a question, Ms . Faith is right, is somewhere around here, clipping stuff in , uh , in my PowerPoint slides, clipping questions, clipping comments, and we will get to them. So you can also support the show there by going to watching the watchers.locals.com. And there is a promo code for a very exciting new thing that I just launched called existence systems. This is my personal productivity, little thing that I talk about regularly, existence systems.com. If you want to check it out, if you're a locals subscriber, if you're a member over there, you get a promo code to get this course, which is available [email protected] We'll talk more about that later. All right. So let's get into the news of the day. Get this queued up. Verdict came out in the Derrick Shovan case and it was convictions on all three counts. Some people were surprised, some not so surprised. A lot of people were very happy about that in different corners of our country. And so today we're going to go through a little bit of the aftermath. What happened? What was some of the fallout as a result of this conviction? As a result of the trial, we spent a lot of time on this channel, taking a deep dive into the Derek Shovan George Floyd case. And so now we want to see what, how is this landing? How, how is society, how is America responding to this new outcome? And so I want to start by going through some pictures and , uh, some articles over from the daily mail. This is one image we saw yesterday, Tuesday afternoon out right outside of the cup foods. So cup food. This is really like, like literally right where the whole situation went down. This is in Minneapolis, Cub foods is right over here. And we see, you know , big memorials for Floyd. A lot of people hugging a lot of , uh, you know , people sort of dancing, clapping in the air, very happy, very excited. We've got, you know, a sign saying , no justice, no streets. You know, the , the sort of the BLM fist is being raised into the air. And so a lot of people are very happy about it. Daily mail is noting that cheers rang out across America from Minnesota to New York city to on Tuesday afternoon as thousands of celebrated. And , uh, there's sort of, you know, this is the culmination of the BLM movement. And we have a lot of months, the summer unrest months over last year. And so it's all sort of, this is the end point of that. Hopefully people are hoping anyways, by an Obama and other senior Democrats vowed to make Floyd's death, a turning point in civil rights. We've seen a lot of that come out thus far, right? We're talking about racial equity. Now we're seeing a lot of the critical race theory. A lot of the civil rights stuff is coming back by phone Floyd's family, outside of court to pledge that he was going to work to change the course of history. We have people were , you know , sort of out there taking the streets. National guard in Minneapolis were able to stand down finally after weeks of on tenterhooks and what is what they're saying. So, yeah, they got to stand down because the people got the verdict that they wanted. They were there in case it went the other way, you know, sort of a little bit of a threat there. If this is not a guilty verdict. Well, you know, the national guard may have been called into play, but because there was convictions across the board, they can now stand down. Floyd's family held a press conference year old daughter was among them. We have pictures of that. We are able to breathe again, said his younger brother, Phil, a nice , uh , felonies justice for George means freedom for all far left Democrats, including AOC and Ilhan. Omar claimed that this is not justice. So, you know, they want sort of more as a result. And Biden's attorney general said that they are opening up a sweeping investigation into the Minneapolis police department. So if you were a part of Minneapolis police department and you thought, Oh my gosh, finally, this is about to be over. We've been living under this burden for a year now. Uh, finally, we're going to get some closure on this. Ah , not so fast there because you have the other three officers who were scheduled for their court. Uh, I think August 23rd, I don't know if that's a trial or a final trial management conference or something to that effect, but they're coming up and now you have the federal government who's parachuting into Minneapolis and they're going to be opening up a sweeping investigation into the Minneapolis PD. So we'll see what that does to the police department there, whether officers stick around or not. We have some more images, lot of happiness and glee from around the country. Here's a woman cheers from outside the courthouse. So a lot of those COVID precautions now are now not so much in effect. Lot of media, you're going to see a lot of cameras all over the place, right? People are, are, are documenting. This is sort of a historic moment for a lot of people. And I saw a lot of images. It was really funny. I don't think I'd be clipped any of them here today because this is sort of the mainstream, you know, new stuff. But there were some images on Twitter of photographers behind rows of photographers behind Rosa photographers, all with somebody posing, you know, taking, you know, fist in the air, whatever taking, you know, it , it was, it was all very, very , uh , Instagrammable , if you want to use that term. And so, you know, people were memorializing this it's a big victory for them. All right. So, you know , good for you G okay, fine. If you want to do that, that's fine. I think that this was a tragic thing for our country across the board. I don't know that either side is better off as a result of this thing. I think the justice system largely feels like both sides have a little bit less faith in it, and I'm not sure that that either side really thought that this was a fair trial. We had , uh , one side who is demanding a particular outcome. You had another side who was concerned that there wasn't, you know , due process that was being afforded and sort of a back and forth both directions, one side won , but I'm not sure that the country ,

Speaker 2:

Uh, on the whole of things, here's another image

Speaker 1:

Where there's people there's power. So again, this is in the nearby area. This is , uh , George Floyd square, the intersection where the fatal arrest took place in may last year. So it was a whole , there was a whole square now more images from outside of cup foods, right. We all remember this, the, the police vehicle was like right here. And , uh, and we saw, you know, a lot of movement throughout this area. A lot of people,

Speaker 2:

You know , close proximity. So celebrate

Speaker 1:

Here's George Florida. Floyd's daughter. Didn't hear much about her throughout the last course of the year, but here she is , uh , at a press conference along with other members of the family here is Terrence

Speaker 2:

Floyd, so that I will miss him. But

Speaker 1:

Now I know he's in history. What a day to be a Floyd man? Yeah. So, you know, families, families making due as a result of their loss and Derek Shovan is off to prison. So we've got some more info on what's going on with him. He's pictured in a prison jumpsuit. You can see him here , uh, you know, sort of in the, the oranges, you know, the , the facial expression there. Um, I'm not sure it looks kind of just kind of dead inside right here is he's pictured in a jumpsuit. He's going to Oak park Heights, maximum security prison, where he's placed on suicide watch ahead of sentencing in eight weeks. So probably, you know, I , I don't think that there's really anything that has, has triggered that kind of just a standard precaution given the fact that he's facing a very serious consequence here, Minnesota doc released a new booking photo woke up from his first night in Oak park Heights. He's being watched closely by guards to ensure his safety, not just as suicide risk, but also from other inmates. Many of whom resent law enforcement may be threats to him. Any of the other inmates there cheers, erupted outside the courthouse. As he was found guilty, he faces a minimum sentence of 12 and a half years. And a maximum of 40 years, former cop is expected to file a Swift appeal to celebrations across the country. Biden called Merrick Garland called gem Bruton . Former warden of Oak park Heights described in his 2004 book about the prison, how the hierarchy among inmates and determined by the crime committed. So you have sort of this hierarchy in prison based upon , uh, the, the severity of the crime at the top of the scale are those who have killed a law enforcement officer at the bottom are sex offenders, child molesters are considered lowest of the low. This hierarchy. Couple was sh uh , Chauvin's infamy as a police officer means he will undoubtedly require bolstered protection and constant monitoring. And then once again, this is an image of, of course, Derek Shovan and the prison where he will be housed for the foreseeable future. And, you know, they , they get very dramatic in these articles. No prisoner has ever escaped from Oak park Heights, which is around houses around 500 of the most dangerous inmates in the state. Okay, great. 25 miles East of Minneapolis on the border with Wisconsin,

Speaker 2:

With Wisconsin, it's kind of

Speaker 1:

A tongue twister there Shovan is being closely watched by guards to ensure his safety and severity be from other inmates. This is what the inside of the cell looks like. This is a medical cell. Jovan is expected to be held out of the prison until the sentencing. So this is , this is medical that doesn't look like a , uh , a jail facility. This is another image from inside, from Oak park Heights. So about what you would expect, right. Typically brighter than what you see in the TV shows TV shows in the movies is like this dark gloomy scene pretty well lit in there. They want to see what's going on inside these facilities. And there was some speculation about Derek Shovan and what he wrote on his hand . So everybody's kind of watching yesterday as the verdict was being announced to see his facial expressions, what does the attorney do? You know, it's a really just awkward situation when you're kinda like, all right , this is what happened. So, you know, they're gonna , they're gonna take you now, sorry, as a really troubling, you know , thing as a, as a defense lawyer to have to sort of it's there , there's no good way to do this. Right. And so everybody's watching, how did this guy lean over, give him a hug, Pat him on the shoulder. What's the deal. So he , he, you know, kind of just, all right , this is it. So what did Derek Shovan write on his hand? Right there there's some something here that was sort of, he was sort of scribbling as the government moved to revoke his bond. He's guilty on all three counts, government and emotions from the state. Yeah . Your honor. Move to re uh , revoke bond and remand. All right . Yes. Granted, he goes into custody, scribbled something on his hand. Well, what the heck was that? Here is what he wrote down. It was his lawyer's phone number. He wrote on his hand, according to the New York post Chauvin's lawyer, Eric Nelson confirmed with TMZ, that his client wrote down the number in anticipation of having his bail revoked, which it was following the guilty verdict on all counts photographs , showing him being escorted, right. Being sorted out writing can be seen on his left. Palm faces a maximum 40 years in prison. So kind of an interesting it's like, was he not, was he not expecting that at all? Like he didn't have a business card. You know, he'd been working with this guy for a year now, did you not have his phone number? Kind of a weird thing to write down at the last minute. So here is Ben Crump and , uh , they were recording the call from the buyer ,

Speaker 3:

Make it all better justice . My dad is going to choose the world's going to start to change.

Speaker 1:

So Joe, Biden's doing his little old man thing, you know, Oh , we're going to change it now is what he said, no , we're going to change it. At least there's justice. At least there's justice. We're going to change this world. All right. So , uh, so yeah, which is hilarious because Joe Biden, of course, as we know here on this channel, we hold them accountable in 1994, crime bill, 1984, 1986, 1988, all responsible , uh, from Joe Biden. He said that any crime bill that came out of, out of the Congress since like 1976, guess whose name and hat on it, Joe Biden's that's according to his own statement, own testimony. So there is no single person in this country, in my opinion, who's more responsible for the current state of our justice system than Joe Biden. Second in hierarchy, there is Camila Harris. So these two yahoos are now out there at the forefront, screaming about criminal justice reform when they are directly responsible. They are the chief architects for constructing the current system that we live in right now, literally. I mean, they passed the laws that we are still trying to undo. When we talk about criminal justice reform, whose laws do you think we're trying to reform? They're not Trump's laws. Okay. They're not bushes laws or Obama's laws. They're all Biden's laws. The same bills that he passed one right after the other for a long period of time. Now they're out there screaming about this. We got to reform all of this stuff and they are just taking the credit for all of this. They're sort of , uh , you know, basking in the glory. We're going to call Floyd, Hey, do you realize that Derek Shovan and the, and the, the entire police department they're a lot of their policies were developed as a direct consequence of the same crime bill that Joe Biden passed in 1994. Right? It trickled all down. What we see in practice is he is the architect of that. So now he's on the phone, Oh, justice, justice, justice. It's like, Hey guys, you know, there's a good argument that if Joe Biden didn't pass all of those bills and we had gone a different direction, maybe none of this stuff would have happened. Maybe our , our system would be much better than it is currently. Now we have to go back and reform a bunch of stuff that the guy in charge created. It's kind of like we're living in the Twilight zone here, but that is what it is. We've got George Floyd and his family of course are reacting to it. So they're very, you know, they're happy about this obviously, and you can't fault them for that, right? Their brother, son, right. Father is not with us anymore in a very gruesome thing. He is, you know , he's become the focus of everything in this country for the last year. Now we have Reverend Al Sharpton who sorta parades in at the last minute, where the hell has he been this entire time? He sort of flies in on his private jet. And now he just raises his hand up with the other people who are directly impacted. We got , uh , uh , Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, both in there. Everybody wants to be a part of this thing. And I'm going to show you why this is so irritating, because this is now becoming sort of a thing. Now it's sort of a , that this is going to be a template that we're going to follow on. All of the cases that happened this way, we have Ben Crump says guilty. Painfully earned justice has finally arrived for George Floyd's family verdict is a turning point in history and sends a clear message on the need for accountability of law enforcement, justice for black America is justice for all America. And I agree with a lot of, of ideas here that we do need some justice reform, and we do need some serious modifications and improvements in our legal system. Uh, but yeah , I do have some issues about how we got here. So we're going to get into more of that. I'm sure by new America says we cannot stop here. Joe Biden said on Tuesday that the system , uh, that the, the conviction can be a giant step forward. He declared it's not enough by and spoke from the white house hours after the verdict alongside Kamala Harris. So we have the, the biggest crime duo in the country are now out there talking about, you know, we can't stop here, says Joe Biden, Biden Harris called on Congress to act swiftly to address policing reform, including approving a bill name for Floyd who died with his neck under Chauvin's knee . Beyond that president said, the entire country must confront hatred to change hearts and minds, as well as laws and policies. I can't breathe. Those were Floyd's. Last words said, Biden. We can't let those words die with him. We have to keep hearing those words. We must not turn away. We can't turn away. So he's, you know, he always does that thing. A measure for of justice. Isn't the same as equal justice said, Kamala Harris. We are so relieved. Okay. So we've got those two people here is Merrick Garland. Now very short statements. As the jury in the state trial of Derrick Shovan has fulfilled its civic duty and rendered a verdict, convicting him on all counts while the state's prosecution was successful. I know that nothing can fill the void that the loved ones of George Floyd have felt since his death justice department has previously announced a federal civil rights investigation into the death of Floyd. This investigation is ongoing, so that's going to be continuing forward. So a lot of happiness out there, and then we have some people who are not happy, right? And a lot of people have been saying this for a long time. Also, what is it going to take to actually make these people happy? It's been a criticism that I have been lobbying for a long time. Now. I really don't know what the final , uh , sort of end point is for some of these movements like BLM. I mean, is it literally defund the police? Is that what we're talking about? If you're not happy with this stuff, if you're not happy that there was a conviction in Chauvin's case, what else do you think needs to be done? And I've several times on this channel, proffered, multiple solutions. I have several PowerPoint slides that just have lists of different solutions and , um , I'm open to them. I, you know, I'm not, I'm not saying that at all. I'm, I'm open to them, but I would like to see some proposals from some of these people. And if it is just defund the police, well, then, you know, we gotta , we gotta see some activity on that. I want to see some bills. I want to see some momentum because right now we have just a lot of people who are pontificating about this stuff. And a lot of these people are elected officials. They're actually in Congress. So they have the power to do some of this stuff. But you're Jacob Frey in Minneapolis who sort of, you know, complaining about it. You're the mayor, brother. Why don't you get out there and do something about this? You've got, you know , AOC over here. You've got president Biden and Kamala Harris right now. Okay. Congress go do something about that. So we'll see, we'll see if anything gets done. I doubt it. But here is AOC who is also unhappy about this on her Instagram, right outside the congressional building. Okay .

Speaker 4:

It's not justice. And I'll explain to you why it's not justice. It's not justice because justice is George Floyd going home tonight to be with his family. Justice is Adam Toledo getting tucked in by his mom tonight. Justice is when you're pulled

Speaker 2:

Gary not being.

Speaker 1:

So she just goes off . You know, who knows what she's even talking about? Sounds like she's talking about a time machine, you know, justices George Floyd going home to his family. Okay. Well we can't .

Speaker 2:

I have that . Okay. We're not living in bizarro land fantasy world. George Ford is not going to come home. Adam

Speaker 1:

Is not going to get tucked in. So what is your other solution? Is there anything else that you would like to propose that we can act on? And if it's just defund the police, let's see a bill, get what the other ladies there and your crew and do your thing and submit a bill so that we can see it. Because I hear a lot of talking from a lot of these politicians and it's all useless. I'm pretty sick of it. So we have Nancy Pelosi now in one of the most condescending things I've ever seen, we saw this yesterday. We played it, but I was sort of scattered. Cause we were, I was trying to consume all the news. I got to watch it again. And I'm just sort of blown away that this is an elected person who is saying this. So she comes out. You probably saw this again. I just wanted to dunk on it one more time. Here is Nancy Pelosi saying, thank you, George Floyd for dying. And she looks up at the sky. She's like, thank you, George. Thanks for Diane, George. And then she goes out and listen to this. It's so frigging patronizing. I can't even take it. She says he called out for his mom. Isn't that sweet looking around. Like he just did something funny. You were like a four-year-old right. Oh , look what he did. Oh , he just, he just took the cap off that thing. That's great. Right? Oh, isn't that sweet. And I mean, this, this folks, when I see this stuff, it's hard for me to sort of think that these people are even remotely genuine at all. Right. And I know they're politicians. I try to give them the benefit of the doubt from time to time. Maybe she comes out here and really does give a statement about George Floyd, right? Awful thing. The whole thing's a tragedy, right? I do feel bad for Floyd . I do feel bad for children . I feel bad for the whole city. I feel bad for the whole country because it's not good for anybody. The justice system is, is, is set back dramatically by these cases

Speaker 2:

Because everybody's upset about it. Nobody's

Speaker 1:

Really happy, except a very small select few of people who then when the next thing happens, they're not happy about it. AOC is also not happy. They're not going to wake up tomorrow and go, you know what? This is good . This is great. Derek Shovan w that was justice. In fact, that he got what he deserved. He got convicted on all three counts. Therefore I have some faith in the justice system. Let's get back to business. Maybe the next time that a white officer kills a black person, maybe we give that officer the benefit of the doubt or, or the justice system. Maybe not even the officer, maybe the system we just say, well, the system worked this time. So we have a little bit more faith than it. Now, is that going to happen as a result, as a consequence of the Derek Shovan convictions? No, of course not. Right. It's not going to get any better. They're going to complain about the next one. We're going to talk about this in the next segment, we have a legitimate shooting that happened with this , uh , Makaya Brian's

Speaker 2:

Young woman, and we

Speaker 1:

Already see it, right? The narrative is starting back up again. So it's like, you can't win. So here is Nancy Pelosi. Now who I want to just say, look, maybe she's going to come out and be an actual human being for 30 seconds. She can't even muster that here . She's saying thanks for Diane, George. Appreciate it. Also. That was so sweet. You know how you were calling out from your mom, here's Nancy. This is the, this is the most powerful person in our us house of representatives.

Speaker 5:

Well , again, thank you, George boy, for sacrificing your life for justice for being there to call out to your mom. How , how heartbreaking was that call out for your mom? I can't read about because of you and because of thousands, millions of people around the world who came out for justice, your name will always be synonymous with justice.

Speaker 1:

All right . So , uh , as though that, you know, George Floyd sort of woke up and said, you know what? Justice in America needs some reform. I'm going to go sacrifice myself in the name of my country, right? That didn't happen. He was killed, right? He was killed or died in , in an altercation. However you want to, you know , uh , define that the jury said he was killed by Derek Sheldon . That legally is the distinction here. That's why he was convicted. Now we've got some questions that we got to get to [email protected] And our first one comes in from a national populous , says, how significant is the Maxine waters threat for an appeal? Is there any path to mistrial after a verdict? So you're asking basically if there's any way that we can unring this bell or you can, or the defense can unring this bell. And the answer really in my opinion is no. I think, you know, a lot of people out there I've seen some, I've seen some takes out there. Let me, let me, let me disclaimer. This first and foremost, I am not an appeals attorney. Okay. We don't do that. We will very, very rarely do it. And typically we'll bring on sort of external help. There, there are specific attorneys who are very good at appeals and they know how the it's a whole set of separate set of rules. And it's kind of a, it's kind of a thing, right? Even if we want to appeal a case, we'll bring in and hire other attorneys to help us with that. Just because it's kind of a specialized area. If you will , you know , you don't just appeal stuff, something, because you don't like the verdict. You have to find a basis for it, right? If it's a guilty and you want to not guilty, you can appeal it, but it's not going to go anywhere. Unless you have something that you can really sink your teeth into. So on this, you know, this issue about Maxine waters and about her statement and about really any of the due process issues that were taking place throughout the trial, whether it's the city council , settlement or Maxine waters or anybody else sort of ranting and raving about this, I think Jacob Frey, or I think that's his name, the , the Minneapolis mayor also said something before the jurors were sequestered. So, you know, the list goes on and on, is this going to be reversed on appeal? I highly, highly, highly doubt it. Right? And I've seen a lot of commenters out there saying that, yes, it should. There were all in all reality, criminal cases are very rarely reversed on a , on an appeal. And you need to find something that you can sink your teeth into. That was sort of a clear error on the underlying case. It has to be more significant than you just didn't like the outcome, or you thought that maybe it felt unfair. So in other words, what I'm saying is they would have to find something that Maxine waters did that may have impacted literally the case in one way or another. If some juror mentions it, or there's some evidence that comes to light that this did have an impact, other than it was just said, okay, we all know what was said, but what was the consequence in the courtroom on the trial? They're going to have to find something in order for that appeal to have any teeth. And I'm not sure that that they're going to, which is why I think it's probably a long shot shot. E Don test says Robert May have missed your comments on your feeling on Shovan . If you were on the jury, how would you have voted? Is your opinion different now than before the trial started? So it's a great question. So I would have voted not guilty on all three counts. I still stand by that statement. I thought that that was the legally correct answer here. And the reason why I say that, and yes, my opinion did change. My opinion changed pretty dramatically from may of last year, where you can go back on this channel and watch me go through with the George Floyd video. Right. I was very upset about it. So this is insane. It looked like he was fixated. It looked like he was killed with Chauvin's knee on the neck. Right. And I am sort of spring loaded to find fault with police officers. I am a criminal defense attorney. I know I have a bit of a blind spot on that. I know I have to affirmatively sort of, you know, set those emotions aside and think about law enforcement and our justice system in a positive light from time to time, just to sort of put that hat on because I wear defense lawyer hat all day, right. That's I have a whole business about that. We have 20 something people here who are working towards that end. We're very good about that . I'm passionate about it. So I'm just, I'm sort of, of that disposition. So before I knew anything about the case when I was listening to, or watching the video, and that's all I knew, it looked like Shovan murdered Floyd, no question about it. Right. It was sort of my instincts right out of the gate, but I didn't know a lot back then, we know a lot more now. And we know a lot that the government's witnesses have even corroborated for us in particular that Dr. Baker, the government's expert witness who actually did the autopsy and filled out the medical death certificate said specifically the cause of death was cardiopulmonary arrest as a result of a number of different things of those lit of, of the things of all the factors that were on that certificate. We had some pretty big problems that in my opinion creates some very reasonable doubt, not doubt that it's sort of , uh, you know, fleshed out in, you know, a carbon monoxide poisoning or something like that. If the basis for, in my opinion, a not guilty verdict on all three counts. If , if, if, if I was sort of placing that or hanging my hat on carbon monoxide, I would say that was a stretch. Okay. Derek Shovan is not innocent because carbon monoxide came out of the exhaust pipe and went into Floyd's mouth and killed Floyd. Right? I don't believe that for a second. It was one of the defense theories, but it was a bad theory. But if we're going to give the defendant the benefit of the doubt in these cases, as we are required legally to do, given the fact that we have the presumption of innocence still in this country, and given the idea that we have this concept of beyond a reasonable doubt, which means if you have any doubt, that is based in reason as to the defendant's innocence or guilt, if you just doubt it, I'm not positive about that. Then that is enough for an acquittal it's doubt based in reason. And when we heard the government's own expert witnesses, there was a lot of doubt there, Dr. Baker , uh , disagreed with Dr. Tobin as to the cause and mechanism, manner of death, their own expert witnesses disagreed about that, which is why they had to bring in the cardiologists the day after Dr. Baker testified. So on the government side, their own witnesses disagreed about the cause of death. George Floyd, his arterial , his arterial arteriosclerosis combined with his hypertensive heart disease caused major problems with his heart. He already had a lot of heart problems prior in 2019, his blood pressure was like two 16, over 160 . And he had a last-minute ingestion case back then. So if we're going to just analyze this from a causal factor, what was the cause of death for George Floyd? And we have the government's own expert witnesses, not Dr. Baker. There was another woman who came in and she was a medical test by expert test a witness. And she said specifically, if we would have found Floyd at home dead, and we , we opened up his heart, we would have blamed the heart for it. It was that bad. The heart alone would have been sufficient to kill Floyd. Similarly, let's say the heart was fine. Let's say that all of that was okay if Floyd was dead and they found 11 nanograms per milliliter of fentanyl in his blood that was sufficient for death as well. All of those things were, were bonafide contributing factors that were listed on the medical certificate, death certificate. And so if you start to analyze the different causal factors and remember causation was one of the key elements in all three of those charges, before you ever talk about culpable negligence or , uh , you know, felony, whatever, any of those things, salt and intent and , you know, transferred intent and all of those things, causation Shovan caused death. Shovan caused death. Causation. I have a huge problem with it. And I think that beyond a reasonable doubt is such a high standard. There was plenty of doubt in reason in this case , uh , based in reason in this case, that they're just, in my opinion, justifies holding that standard. I know it's not a popular opinion. I know that people disagree with it. I know the jury disagrees with it, but it is, I think critically important that we, that we recognize that if, if, if Derek Shovan put his knee on George Floyd's neck and we learned today, perfect heart, no problems with the heart. No fentanyl, no prior methamphetamine use no last-minute ingestion, no pills in the car, no pills with saliva and DNA that came out of his mouth in the back of the police car, no 2019 prior, no heart history of being over 200 , uh, two , two 16, over one 60. If, if all of those things were absent and Shovan did what he did on Floyd. Well, yeah, of course he would have killed him. Right. Cause that is the single causal factor of death. But that wasn't the case. We have all sorts of other factors that were sufficient to kill him, but they blamed show before because of the video and what they saw. Now, I'm a defense lawyer. So like I said, I'm, spring-loaded to side with the defense. I have no love at all for Derek Shovan, as I mentioned, you can go back. I still, I , I sort of, you know, I look at his facial expressions and it makes my blood boil watching him because he has this smug arrogance about him. I even saw this in court and I was sort of, I didn't comment on it as we were going through the trial, but I would see his facial expressions. And when the judge asked him, if anybody , uh, promised you or threatened you or you under duress, when he , when he was asking him specifically about not testifying Chauvin's face was like, you know, he , it was like a smug smirk. He's like, no judge. Like nobody puts me under duress. Okay. No , I'm not an address . Like, like this is easy. Like I know where this is going. And some , a part of me believes that, right? Why is he writing his attorney's number on his hand? He, he might've thought, you know, I'm getting acquainted all charges. And this was a blind side to him. He goes, well, I leave in the , no , I didn't even know your number, bro. Let me write this down real fast. And so that sort of arrogance, I think translated, I saw that on the video, I saw his knee going into his neck with his hands in his pocket, just looking at people. And I've seen that look on officers a lot. I see it in clients, we represent, we watched body camera videos. I see arrogant , smug officers, treating people like garbage all the time. And it makes my blood boil. And I have no love for Derek Shovan at all. I'm not going to lose any sleep over the fact that he got convicted on this thing. I am him personally. Okay . Him personally , right? Derek Shovan . I got no love for the guy. I have a lot of concerns though, about how our justice system functioned in this trial, because there was plenty of reasonable doubt here. I mean, what, what else do you need? There's fentanyl prior Matthew's heart major heart problems, 90% blockage in one of the arteries and the government's own witnesses confirm that they disagreed with themselves. We even had use of force experts, disagree, Jody Steiger, and the law professor who testified the last on the trial on the government's case. Plenty of reasonable doubt. And it's concerning to me when you have a dog pile that happens on anybody, whether it's Shovan or anybody else, because this happens in this country where innocent people are in Chauvin's position, truly whether you think he's innocent or not, you might think he was right. And that the standard has not been met. And now, you know, this, this is the template. We're going to see this again. We're going to see that this type of behavior from the media, from the courts, from our politicians is okay, it's almost to be expected. And we're going to, we're going to talk about this in the next segment, because Mikaila is now going through the same thing and you can already see the gears turning the pistons are warming up. Everybody's getting geared up for this next George Floyd season, season two, you know, police murdering people in America, season two, we're going to be outraged about everything. So that's my issue, right? The, the, the, the final outcome, all right. The jury listened to the facts. They made a decision. I respect the jurors. Okay. They heard what they heard, and they made a decision and I'm not in that jury room. And I don't know what the situation is like down there at the scene, but as a defense lawyer, I've got concerns. Anytime that there's a Dogpile in this country, anytime that the entirety of the nation just sort of orients themselves towards one person, and we're just going to destroy that person. It reminds me of the mob. And , you know, in the Coliseum , or like in gladiator, I had the , the mob is fickle, right? They're angry at this person. They're angry at that person. That's when that's the S as a society, we have to recognize that anytime that happens, that is extremely dangerous. The person who's at the receiving end of that focus of that laser-like visceral reaction from a country. They need protection and defense more than anybody in this country, when everybody is totally aligned to destroy somebody, that's when they need protection. The most, we got to make sure that we are upholding the mechanisms that protect our justice system at that moment. Because at that moment, that's when people want to start to bend the rules already saw that in the Floyd case, I saw a lot of people. And a lot of these people are Hollywood commentators and things who were saying, well, what do we even need to trial for in the George florid case? We already know what happened. We saw the video. That should be all that we need. I'm going, no, no, no. That's not how this works. Our legal system. We still have due process the presumption of innocence, the right to trial, the right to counsel, and a lot of other very important, fundamental rights in this country. But people want to just bend the rules because they think that they're not that important. We don't need them in this case. So let's just get rid of them. Well, what happens in the next time? This goes down the pike. What happens the next time we have this person in that situation who is in fact, innocent and society wants to just rub their faces in the ground. Well , we can't let them do it and we're not. And so that's why I just want to make sure that we're holding the line on the reasonable doubt standard. I thought there was plenty of reasonable doubt

Speaker 6:

In the Shovan case, even though

Speaker 1:

I have no love whatsoever for Shovan himself. I have love for the reasonable doubt standard and the presumption of innocence. And I'm not sure that we saw much of that in this trial, just as first as yesterday, you see somewhat clinical and quick to move on, but for those of us traumatized to think a man who is not guilty as charged could end up doing significant time, could you offer any tidbits of hope for Shovan or for our justice system? So, so, you know , hopefully justice first, I sorta just kind of went through that a little bit. Uh, I have a lot of concerns for our justice system. I will tell you that, you know, I, I tend to be kind of a hopeful person, but I'm not real sure what what's happening right now, because there is a big segment of this country that is sort of reorienting , uh , towards a difference, a different perspective here. And I'm going to , let me, let me, let me table this one, because I'm going to tell you what I think might be happening in the next segment, because we're seeing a very similar situation to Floyd's case sort of now bubble up. And I'm seeing a very coordinated sort of orchestrated conversation going back the other direction from people in very high positions of power, like Valerie Jarrett. And I think that they may be telegraphing where there , where this justice system thing might be going. So let me table that one , uh, you know, Derek Shovan , I think he's,

Speaker 6:

He's, it's,

Speaker 1:

It's close to the end of the line for him. If I had to guess. Yes, yes. He'll appeal it, but I don't have much optimism that there's going to be anything that the appeals court does on reverse, unless there's anything could happen. A juror could come out, you know , a week from now and say, you know, somebody in there was threatening me and whatever, and that would obviously, you know, all bets are off the table at that point in time. But the , the justice system is it's on Rocky waters right now. And we're gonna explain, I think, why in a little bit LT 33, 13 LT, 13 says, did you see Floyd's girlfriend was Dante rights Dean or something in high school? No, I did not see that. Uh, no, that's crazy. That is a weird, weird coincidence. I did not see that, but that is an interesting little tidbit LT. We have Sharon Quinney in the house says, this is an indication of a real change. All right. The death of due process, equal protection, and especially the presumption of innocence, it's the triumph of mob rule. Yeah, it's it, it certainly feels like that. Right. And you see, you see a city that created an environment supported by their local politicians that made it very hard to provide a fair trial. In my opinion, the jurors literally were walking back into , you know , from that building, from the core building in the middle of this whole environment, it's hard not to be persuaded. You have Patriot, Musk's says, Rob, are you happy with the verdict? Uh, you know, if I can be honest about it, I'm sort of indifferent really about the whole thing. I'm not, I'm not happy or sad about it. You know, I sort of , uh, expected that I was expecting kind of a guilty on all counts. I sort of felt that the wave of the country was going that direction. Uh, as soon as I, as soon as I heard that it was decided in like eight hours, I was like, Oh gosh, you know, this is going to be guilty across the board. Now, legally I said yesterday, I w I , I think the correct outcome, if I were a juror, I would say the correct outcome is there's plenty of doubts . And , uh , and I would have voted to acquit on all, on all three charges , uh, based on the evidence that we heard. And I spent a lot of time covering it and I've got clips and everything. So we may be actually trying to assemble sort of a highlight reel of the trial, and maybe we'll make even an argument in there, but we'll see, you know , uh, I can't say I'm happy or disappointed about it. It's sort of sort of clinical, you know, I sort of watched it expecting that this was probably going to be the outcome. Uh, I have, I would say I'm quite jaded about how I, how I feel about how people interpret reasonable doubt and the presumption of innocence. And I've experienced that regularly as a criminal defense attorney, right? People sort of presume that you're guilty and that you have to convince the court and the jurors that you're innocent and that's not the case at all. And the judge can tell people that can tell them to their face. Hey, you can't, you know, this person is innocent and they go, Oh yeah, that makes sense. And they just don't get it right, because they've been so conditioned by movies and law enforcement and the courts to think that anybody who's sort of on the receiving end in a position of power, if the power structure is kind of crashing down on one particular person, everybody thinks, well, they deserve it. That's the system, right. They must have done something wrong. And then we have to, you know, we have to sort of try to reverse that as defense lawyers, when really it's not our burden supposed to be on them, but practically it's not it's on us. So when I see stuff like this happen, I have, yes, I have a lot of concern for our justice system. And I also have concerned that I think that people in this case don't really realize what they're cheering. You know, it's kind of a strange that the hats are reversed. The roles are reversed. In this case, you have, you know, you have, let's say the African-American community, right? You have BLM, you have anybody who's out there protesting for Dante, right? George Floyd, they are

Speaker 2:

Thrilled that the prosecutors won in this case. And I'm thinking you don't like to , like today,

Speaker 1:

Those same prosecutors, that same prosecutor's office, they're protests, they are prosecuting some of the protesters they're prosecuting some of, you know , other drug offenses like George Floyd has been suffered . You know , what was, was basically facing drug charges or counterfeiting charges, or just disorderly conduct charges. In other words, the police are going to go out and arrest more people from their communities. And they're just thrilled with the prosecutor's office, which is sort of like

Speaker 2:

Reversal, right? Typically the left doesn't like law enforcement today, anyways, and the , the rights doesn't like defense

Speaker 1:

It's attorneys, they they're all in favor of prosecution and law enforcement. So now the defense now that collected traditional conservatives are sort of going, this is ridiculous. What do you mean the government can come out here and do this. They can just convict an innocent person. And this is what I've been saying for a long time. Yes, they can conservatives. This is sort of a wake-up call. This is what this looks like on a regular basis. The government has a ton of power and S and S citizens in our society. They don't even hesitate. They'll convict you all day long if you're a conservative. And you're thinking that the reasonable doubt standard or the presumption of innocence is a proper check on a tyrannical authoritarian, overly bureaucratic, you know , endless power monopolistic government. If you think that those things are gonna protect you from it, I got a rude wake up call for you. And this may have been that you saw what happened. You saw that there was plenty of doubt thrown out there, but the system just said,

Speaker 2:

Nah , by not even gonna listen to you. And th th the citizens in the jury panel,

Speaker 1:

Ours , didn't even have to think about it. Jen McClellan says, Pelosi saying, Floyd's name is synonymous with justice. Must be, must really stink for the victims of his armed robberies. I don't think he deserved to die, but he's being made out of some kind of a Saint. And that just ain't right? Yeah. I mean, he's got a square now. They're going to pass a bill now. And I agree with you. I don't think that he deserves to die, but is, is he a , is he St America? No, no, no. He was not. And so when people get out there and they start trying to make something out of nothing and they , they want to , you know , puff everything up into something that it isn't it's are we, are we having conversations in reality land anymore? We have Sharon. He says, you ask what these people want. They want a totalitarian communist dictatorship with racial injustice as the basis for the revolution instead of class struggle. This is stated agenda and the founders of BLM. Yeah. So, so I think that is , is actually exactly right, right. This sort of racial struggle, this, this revolution. And I think you sort of hit it on the head. I was going to get to this in a later segment, but the idea would be that

Speaker 2:

Law enforcement

Speaker 1:

Is just no longer legitimate. It's not a legitimate function of the state anymore. And,

Speaker 2:

And it's sort of, it's sort of dividing on a racial barrier. We have the , the, the,

Speaker 1:

You know , white police officers who are part of the white patriarchy, a part of that original sin that Biden talks about part of the stain on America. That's white law enforcement officers. That's our current justice system. And so what we're going to see when we get to the Bryant shooting is this predisposition to default to anything an officer does is wrong. Okay? Cause we're going to see that in the next segment, he shoots a woman that has a knife and is in the process of stabbing somebody. And this officer's getting skewered about it. When, when in my opinion, it was the right thing to do. But the question is, should an officer be doing anything, should an officer be responding to this stuff? That's the logical extension of defund the police, the cop. Look, if the cops shouldn't have even been there, then yeah. Then he shouldn't have shot. Right? And I that's actually where this is going, all right , we're going to get there. I'm getting ahead of myself. Good question. We have norovirus says, all those comments are very inflammatory to all the people who thought Shovan was not guilty. And Floyd was a dead man walking with the amount of drugs he did and his health would have killed him within months. He was not going to go home today. And if it's not enough that his family got 27 million of taxpayer's money, horrible thing to say, but they are not unhappy about the way he died. The other option would be that he would have died in prison in the next few months. Yeah . That's a , that's a spicy comment. There are norovirus as is the case. You got a lot of spice and , uh, and we're glad that you're here. We have hack consulting says, Nancy, thank you, Nancy Pelosi for finally being a truthful politician. Glad to see you openly showing how you turn everything into a political weapon. Thanks, George Floyd. Thanks for Diane. Thanks for Diane George. We have a , mafic says I'm all too glad to say the left is being horrendously hypocritical, being happy with this opinion. I actually care about justice reform. Felony murder rules are on the fists or on the F are one of the first on the chopping block. Minnesota's felony murder. It needs to go, period. They have they'd have agreed with this, but Hey, now that is helping convict Shovan. Yeah, no , look, I agree with you ma I think that, that you're right. You know, it's, it's, it's kind of a weird thing that something that is just a tragedy across the board,

Speaker 2:

Your people were jumping out of their seats. Man's going to prison for killing another, man, what are we celebrate

Speaker 1:

That for ? You know? And then it's sort of a, it's sort of premature celebration. Like it's a celebration that there was justice done, but then they all come out and say, well, this isn't justice. This is just the start of something else. Okay. Well then what are you so happy for? We have blazing guns says, can an appellate court declare a mistrial or retry Shovan? Or is that not legally possible? It is legally possible. I mean, basically what they do is they remanned it back down. It's called a remand. So you'll, you'll, you know , appeal an issue. You'll say , uh, the judge, let's say, for example, after the settlements came out, the judge, I don't think did the judge void dear everybody again, let's say, I don't know about the settlement, but let's say about the, yes, the judge did void . Dear everybody. Again, the judge started to impanel people. The settlement came out, the judge called several people back, questioned them again because he thought it was appropriate.

Speaker 2:

Then the trial moved forward. Okay. So let's take that as a standard.

Speaker 1:

When there's a big news story, the judge brought the , the jurors back and asked them questions about it. Hey, did you hear about this $27 million settlement ? Several jurors said, yeah, we did. And I think somebody said, yeah, I did. And I'm not going to be impartial anymore. Judge booted that person. Okay. So in jury selection, judge gets a big news story, thinks it's appropriate to request the jurors and then throw some of them out. When they said they can't be an impartial anymore.

Speaker 2:

Then the trial is ongoing and this happens again, Maxine waters

Speaker 1:

Runs her mouth, started screaming about, you know , conflict , get more confrontational unless there's a guilty verdict. Trial is still

Speaker 2:

Well going on.

Speaker 1:

And at that point, the jury, I don't think has been sequestered yet. Right. I think it was like in the middle of closing arguments. So now at this time the judge does he do what he did the last time this happened and, and revoke dear all the jurors. No , he didn't do that. Right. So no , I told them to not watch the news. I told them to stay off the internet. So we're just gonna leave it at that. Do you know why he did that? Because he probably knows that if he would have called them in, somebody would have said, yeah. And then, or maybe several of them. And then he would have had to throw him off the bench and they would have had to been, had been a mistrial. And the case was so far down the line

Speaker 2:

That

Speaker 1:

Judge didn't want to do this over again. Sort of , you know, once you sort of get over the tipping point in the trial, now it's like, Oh , we're just gonna finish this thing. If there's a problem, the appeals court can deal with it. So that's what this judge did. And so if there's really any argument, I think that that is a pretty good one. That the judge, when there was a big news story, he asked the jurors about it once. Then it happened again. He didn't do it again. That's a different standard. Why is that

Speaker 2:

Appeal?

Speaker 1:

Say the jurors may have been improperly biased . The judge broke his own standards. Say we want a new trial. If the appeals court agrees, remand that sucker back down, do this whole

Speaker 2:

Thing again. Maybe in a different

Speaker 1:

Venue, probably get a different verdict. Hack consulting says the only thing I think we need to change is that no one understands

Speaker 2:

Beauty or stopped to look

Speaker 1:

For it. Everyone is trying to change the world. Why don't we stop and find something nice to appreciate whether it is related to anything or we'll never see again. Why don't we just take a second to see something and then try to figure out why it caught our eye. So beautiful comment there , hack consulting. And there's a rule in this book in the , I think it's beyond order by Jordan Peterson. I think, I think it's rule five, but he talks about

Speaker 2:

Creating one room

Speaker 1:

In your home. That's the most beautiful room of anything that you have in your life. It's something like that. It's obviously putting much better, create one room in your home. That's the most beautiful room in your home. And it's, it's really a part of this concept, right? As human beings, we sort of grow up and mature out of beauty. We stop looking for it. You take a three or four year old , right? Everything is beautiful. Everything they see is mesmerizing. They're awestruck everywhere. They turn everything. You turn on, everything you hand . Oh my gosh, everything's beautiful. And amazing. Then as we get older, I've seen that before, right? The grand, what? The grand Canyon, who cares? Right? So there's a river and no , no big deal. And you just kind of ignore it. So what Jordan Peterson says, Hey, you got to get in touch with that beauty, go find a piece of artwork and spend some money on it. Spend some time on this thing, go and go to an art gallery. Look around, spend 10 hours. Looking at these things. Find something that is beautiful. Check in with it every day. And I'm in the process of doing that right now, based on that rule, I think it's rule five. Check it out. Great book beyond order from Jordan Peterson. Now Darla Sierra says maybe this will wake people up to finally realize that innocent until proven guilty. Hasn't been a standard for us, a little folks for a long time. Now maybe all the media coverage we'll get will make people mad enough to do something about it. I don't know, man. I think that, I think that they're kind of doing cartwheels over this stuff and I'm not good. Not good because it's, it's a standard. That standard is going to be applied in other cases. Okay. The next time it's not going to be Shovan in the defendant's share . It's going to be somebody like George Floyd. Not that many cops get charged with crimes. A lot of people who are addicted to opioids and have prior criminal records and who are passing counterfeit bills. Yeah. They get charged a lot, a lot more than the Derek Chauvin's are. And if the burden of proof and the presumption of innocence are watered down in this case, guess where that

Speaker 2:

It ends up in the other cases and

Speaker 1:

We're gonna have to deal with those consequences. All right. So that is Derek Shovan long segment. We got , uh , we got another one day to get to , we got another shooting. We just finished one. And we already got to start talking about another one. So

Speaker 2:

Here we've got switch my slides over here. We have a,

Speaker 1:

Another shooting we're talking about Ms. Bryant , Mikaila . I think [inaudible] is her name McCaya Bryant was shot and killed yesterday, right on the verge of the Shovan verdict. And it was something that sort of captured a lot of people, attention in the media. And there's already started to say things like, well, Hey, Shovan hasn't even been convicted yet. And already we have another white officer killing another black person. And so the media went into hyperdrive hyperventilation mode as they usually do. And we want to break this down because there's a lot going on here. And we're starting to see some people who are part of the power establishment, sort of, you know, the people who were part of big think tanks. And they're already starting to craft this narrative that the cop was wrong in this situation. Even though if you watch this as we're going to do well, you can be the judge of this, right? You can tell me whether or not this officer's shooting was legitimate or not. And so we're going to go through this in a little bit of a reverse order. You may have already seen the video in this case and we're going to play it. We are going to show you the body camera. Now, a little content warning in this segment, of course, we're talking about a young woman who was 16 years old. Who's not with us anymore. Uh , she shot and killed. And so w w we are going to have some imagery. We're going to talk about some of these concepts. I just want to forewarn you. When we do get to the body cameras, there are her , her face is blacked out and the moment of the shooting is clipped out and everything else is pretty blurred. It's pretty well sanitized, but I just want to give you that little bit of a content warning. We're not going to spend a lot of time going through the scene, but we are going to be talking a lot about the reaction . So just be cognizant of that. That is the content warning for the segment. Now, the body camera, this is what we're , uh , let me frame that out a little bit better. We're going to go back through this sort of in real time, we're going to rewind the clock back a little bit and say, well, what , what happened back at four 30 yesterday as this was all unfolding, because I want to show you sort of the timeline, the sequence of events, we had a big issue. And then we had a lot of reactions trickling in before even the evidence was out before the body camera of the shooting was even released. So let's work our way through this. Here we saw yesterday from 10 TV, that officers were called to Legion lane, North of Chatterton road at about 4:30 PM for a disturbance, right? And that was right around the same time that the Shovan verdict was being announced. According to interim chief Michael Woods , caller reported females were trying to stab them. Dispatcher tried to obtain more information, but the call was disconnected. Footage released from the police came after the first officer or came from the first officer on scene. In the video. The teen appears to attempt to stab two people with a knife before the officer fires his weapon. What? So that, that doesn't sound like that's unjustified, right? That's somebody who attacking somebody with a knife. Chief woods said officers immediately assessed her for injuries called for a medic and gave her CPR. During this time, an officer can be heard saying she came at her with a knife. The teen was taken to Mount Carmel East in critical condition where she was later pronounced, dead, unclear whether anyone else was injured, though. Police declined to release her name. The mother identified her as McCaya Brian's . Okay. So interesting spelling, ma apostrophe, K H I a. So I'm going to probably butcher that throughout the show . So McCaya Bryant and this was unfolding yesterday. Then we started to see some reaction and a lot of this reaction was very similar to what we saw during the Floyd incident. We have , uh , somebody, you know, people are posting on Twitter right away. Hey, you know, flying heaven, baby girl, rest in heaven. The police killed my daughter today in Columbus, Ohio. Right? So this person , uh, Paula Bryant hopped right on Facebook , uh , right after it happened, the police killed my daughter today in Columbus, Ohio. Right? And , uh, Paula, Brian writes that's mom. So first thing mom does after her daughter is gunned down is get on Facebook. All right . 45 minutes later, here we are fly high and having baby girl rest in heaven. The police killed my daughter today on Facebook yesterday. Then we see around the scene, a lot of protesters start showing up. So we've got this guy with a Bullhorn, just ready to rock and roll protesters soon, convene at the crime scene and called for action. After witnesses described what led to the shooting, right? So everybody's pouring in there now, right around the scene. This took place outside of the home. And so we're going to see more of this. Then we have somebody who's basically auditioning now, right? So the media is now showing up. We've got cameras. This is before body cameras were even released before we even really know what's going on, right? This just happened. It's still light outside. This happened during the, you know, the afternoon four 30, it's still light out. Media is there. And this is a McCaya Bryant's aunt, aunt Hazel Bryant. And she's auditioning right for the media. So she's out there now screaming about they, you know, they shot her, her niece essentially. And we've got everybody taking pictures. We got the microphones media. Is there, you know , everybody's, she's, she's out there performing. And I look at that's what it looks like to me. And I know that may sound insensitive, but your niece was just shot and killed. What are you doing right now? Are you renting to the media? What are you doing? Like , why are you not with your family? Same situation. Here is the mother who is now giving a statements right after this happened. The police are still there. She was just shot killed, like, right, like right here. As far as I can tell, right? Th th this is police vehicles right there. There's crime tape. Mom just kind of walks outside of the house and wants to give a statement.

Speaker 3:

Kyle was named after a male prophet in the Bible. She was a very loving, peaceful little girl. She was 16 years old. She was an honor roll student. And , um, McKayla had a motherly nature about her. She promoted peace and that's something that I want to always be remembering .

Speaker 1:

So yeah. So mom, you know , daughter just got shot like four times. Uh , his mom comes out and says, Oh yeah , Hey , excuse me, news camera . Are you over? Let me give you a statement. And the news just runs right over here, right in your face. It's a weird thing that, that everybody's just so media hungry. Uh, as a, as a 16 year old girl just got shot. I don't get it. I mean, all right . Then we saw, you know, outside of the police headquarters, crowds for him

Speaker 3:

Last night,

Speaker 1:

It is pouring in, right. We've got a new, a new shooting. You got, everybody's got to go be a part of it. And protest . Here are some more people. The whole system is something. Can't see what that is, but they're forming a line of shields, right, right. Outside the police headquarters. They're screaming . Say her name. Okay. Uh , Brian, say your name. Okay, Brian . And it's not just me who was looking at this stuff and saying, this is really weird. There's a strange thing happening right now because everybody is seeming to be piling on this stuff. Now, ordinarily, I expect the media yes. To go out there and pick a side and then, you know , uh , bloviate for that side until they're blue in the face. But this was sort of a different level. And I want to share with you a blog post over from all upon [email protected] . Uh, very, very , uh , you know , I like read his stuff. I disagree with him a lot of the time, but he he's, he's on the money on this one. And he wrote some media outlets and even senators sure were eager to make the McKayla Brian shooting a story about race, which is exactly what I was noticing. He said some members of our fair and balanced media, didn't wait for details to decide what the Brian's story was really about. And I like how he does this, right? Really about both of those are capitalized really about like RA, right? Because that's just what the media does. Right? Every single story has a ulterior motive. On the very day that Shovan was convicted for the murder during an arrest of Floyd, another incident in which a white officers had killed a black girl, a minor, no less had dropped in their lap. Fate had handed them an opportunity to declare that while justice had been done in the Floyd case, unjust police brutality toward African Americans will not only continue, but had already added to its body count before Shovan had even left the courtroom. The narrative was too good to check all our rights. So they didn't. The story was about race first and foremost, they concluded. And so he took some screenshots of this stuff, right. Which is something that I like to do here. And he summarized and here's NPR says, Columbus police shoot and killed black teenage girl. Like that's a, that's a headline. I write , uh , not an armed teenage girl, not a teenage girl attacking another girl, not the police shoot and kill a attacker who was threatening to murder somebody. Right. They shouldn't kill a black teenage girl. Whoa. What on the day that Derek Shovan just got convicted. The police shoot and kill a black teenager girl. It's terrible. Then the daily beast does it. Right? Columbus police released body camera footage and fatal shooting of black teen Axios. Does it? Columbus police officer fatally shoots, black teenage girl slate. Does it? Black teenage girl is shot and killed by Columbus police. So does the Washington post garbage newspaper, Ohio police fatally shoot black teenager girl just before the Shovan verdict. They are all salivating at this story. Oh my God, this is perfect. Shovan just got convicted. Some white cop just killed a black teenage girl. Like one after the other, all the blog writers at the post are salivating over this stuff. Let's go back to all upon it . He says the post headline is especially egregious since it was published this morning. Okay. They published this this morning, this one, Ohio police fatally shoot and kill black teenage girl just before Shovan verdict. They publish that today, not yesterday. So they have even less excuse for not viewing the body cam footage before drawing a conclusion, Jerry Gerald by year, according to this person notes that the post story never States that Bryant had a knife in her hand, even though it's clearly visible in the video. So then they're just, they're just flat out lying to you, right? I mean, that's a fact that is obviously evident that we can see it. The Washington post, which is supposed to be a newspaper, a legitimate newspaper don't even mention that they acknowledged that quote sheet lunged at someone and that a knife was found next to her after she fell. But they'll allow by way of reporting. All they'll allow is that she was trying to stab someone that police claimed that she did. What if I told you that you could wait to report on facts until you verified them journalists who have occasion to go back and realize that they have reported some key facts wrong in the heat of a breaking story. She'd have a little more humility in judging people whose jobs involve making graver decisions in less time with no ability to edit their own mistakes later. Isn't that interesting? Right. So, so Dan McLaughlin is saying, Hey, you know, writers get to go back and edit their material. Cops. Don't Dan McGlaughlin , he's a little more charitable to the press. And I'm willing to be jumping to conclusions about the Bryan shooting. Wasn't an honest mistake, says Allah based on having received bad facts, it was a conclusion they eagerly lead to because they had a storyline. They were motivated to push enough so that they were willingly. They were willing to run initially with Bryant's aunt's account of the shooting, even though she didn't witness it herself, right. That was the same woman who I showed you was auditioning earlier out there in front of the media, ranting and raving about what happened. She wasn't even there didn't know anything about it. They killed my niece. They shot my niece, blah , blah , blah . She wasn't even there, but the media was there, lapping it up, just soaking this all up. So let's get into what actually happened. This is from the interim chief of police, I believe is now giving a press conference. And he's going to tell us about the officer, right? He's gonna introduce us to the officer. Officer's name is Nicholas , and he's going to identify them so we can use his name. Uh , but I'm going to show you why we're going to blank out this officer's name in a minute, which is not something I traditionally do, but I'm going to show you why we do that. Here is this chief of police. Now giving us a little bit of background on what happened.

Speaker 7:

The first video we're going to show you is from officer Nicholas Riordan , officer Riordan was working a one officer car. He was hired in December of 2019. He's a currently assigned to zone to second shift. And he is the officer that discharged his firearm.

Speaker 1:

All right . So there, there are identifying him. And you know, there are people out there already calling for this guy's head, which is a little bit concerning, of course, but , uh , I want to show you, this is the, the video, right? So this is the video of officer Riordan getting out of his car. Uh, we're not gonna watch the whole thing. It's about four minutes. I think we're going to clip the beginning and end of it. Now, this is where the shooting happens . So content warning it's coming next, but it is highly edited. So you're not going to see the actual shooting. You are going to hear some profanity that has not been edited out. And then you're going to see a lot of bowlers around, but you're still gonna be able to make sense of this. And a couple of things I want to point out first and foremost, this officer is moving quickly, right? He gets out of the car. This thing is already in motion. And you're going to see that this is not just like a two-party fight. There are several people involved in this and this officer is having to sort of assess the threats extremely quickly. You're going to see on the back right or near the vehicle . So let me, let me just show you right now, before I start playing it. So this is officer Riordan . He's gonna be coming around here. He's going to be sort of, you know , pacing around this area, coming upon the scene. And then you're going to notice a couple of things happen very quickly. So somebody is gonna sort of fall in the ground over here on the other side of the vehicle. And he's going to sort of assess that quickly than somebody lunges up. And this woman here in pink is going to be pressed up against this wall. And then McKayla is going to be sort of, you know, engaging with her in this direction. So the officer's going to run around here and you're gonna see a gentleman, somebody over here , uh, kicking somebody else. So like somebody is running over here and just like throwing a lobbing , a kick. And then there's somebody in the background here, puts his hands up. And so it's kind of , it's kinda , man, it's kind of madness. This officer in this entire scene is able to act very quickly and we're going to break down what happens. We're gonna watch this first through and through then we're going to go back and we've got a , uh , a freeze of , of one of the , the most important part of everything that we're looking at. So here is the video from officer Riordan . Once again, content warning, nobody, nobody dies in this video, right? She dies later at the hospital. We don't see the shooting, you hear it. And uh , all of the facial expressions are blanked out. Obviously she's not with us anymore, but her face is blinked out for privacy because she is underage . Here is the shooting

Speaker 3:

[inaudible] .

Speaker 1:

So we , we saw that right. Happens very, very quickly. The I'm not going to play it again. But the key one that you want to see is the key frame that comes out is this clip, okay? There's a knife right there. And this is, you know , going in the direction of this woman. And you saw that altercation and , uh, you know , she she's, she's gonna stab her. Right. And she sort of makes several attempts to start to start swinging a little bit. And she puts her hands up. Now she's this woman also has a dog in her hands. So she drops, the dog kind of protects herself and then the shooting happens. And then of course McCaya , uh , is hit and then sorta drops to the ground over here. Then we have another video from another body camera, from another officer. Who's walking with a woman in pink and you're going to hear them sort of walking back to the car. Then you'll hear the woman say, yeah, she came at me with a knife that off that other officer stopped her. Right? So she's sort of the victim of this assault. And she's saying, no , he's like she was going to stab me and he stopped. So the victim here is sort of, you know, agreeing with the idea that this officer essentially saved her life. Let's listen to it

Speaker 3:

With a knife. So he got her [inaudible] all right . One more time with a knife. Yeah . So she , so she got her,

Speaker 1:

Right ? So yeah. So he got her, right. He got her, she was coming at you with a knife. Something happen with that clip. I don't know why. Uh , but yes, he got her right. And so the officer already came out , uh, the , the chief of police came out, identified the officer, it's this guy here, daily mail is now publishing his picture. I'm blocking out his face today. Uh, and traditionally I don't block out officer's face faces. And that's typically because I'm calling them bad Popo and they deserve the attention. But what we're going to see here is that there are people now calling that this guy is quote next. So there , there are, there are actually people out there who were saying this guy's next, right? We're going to get you next. And so , uh , it's almost threatening and I've got a screenshot of what that looks like here in a minute. So we're not going to contribute to that , uh, that mob justice, because this, in my opinion was a perfectly lawful shooting. And what we've got here is the officer. And so, you know, they're , they're saying officer Riordan , standing on the scene, shooting, killing Bryant . He's been on the force since December, 2019. So, you know , relatively new officer and in this picture, it kind of looks like he's got his hands on his gun as we have a woman laying dead here. And he's having a conversation over here, you know, explaining to somebody. And if I remove these blocks, you know, it's not a flattering picture. It looks like this guy just like, yeah, just , uh, took care of business over there. Right. And I'm certain that that's not how he feels, but these pictures are, you know, are w we saw what the George Floyd picture looked like. We saw what that did and the power there and how these pictures and videos and images all get manipulated. And so they were kind of doing that here. He kind of looks like he's just posted up and we see, you know, feet from a dead person lying right there as he's looking off into the distance. And so you can see this narrative is already starting to fester. Here is another statement about what's going to happen next. So is this officer going to get charged with a crime who knows anymore? Right? I don't think so. Shouldn't in my opinion, but we'll see. This is , uh , the chief of police now telling us what's going to happen. Next

Speaker 7:

Makaya , Brian has been positively identified as the 16 year old killed in this incident. And law enforcement has been in contact with her family. As I said last night, the important step now is for BCI to conduct a independent and transparent investigation. The Columbus division of police will assist them, but we will not interfere in any investigative process that they have. Our role is to provide them the information that they request and do. So in a timely manner, we will not interfere. We will not provide input. We will allow them to conduct their investigation at the conclusion of their investigation, that investigation is sent to the Franklin County prosecutor's office. Where will we be presented to a Franklin County, grand jury? And eventually the packet will cover the Columbus division of police that week will review that incident for policy compliance or violations.

Speaker 1:

All right . So there's gonna be a full investigation as there should be right there. Always, anytime somebody dies, like we should never just go back and say, well, look good to me. How about you, Lou? Yeah. John now look good. All right, good . We'll wrap this up. Put , you know, put a note. Do you know what the file? Yeah . Note not to file it . It deserves an investigation and it deserves a review. And I think that this officer is going to be completely cleared. Now the media is doing what they can to sort of twist this story as we've already seen. And it's just, you know, it's , it continues , uh, take a look at what the New York times did. So here's Ben Crump over on Twitter. And this was George Floyd's attorney. If you called the family's attorney. And he posted says, as we breathe a collective sigh of relief today, a community in Columbus felt the sting of another police shooting as Columbus police killed an unarmed 15 year old black girl named McCaya Bryan's . Now the child has lost another hashtag justice for Mikaila Bryant, right? Which is obviously not accurate. He posted three hours ago. She did not , uh, shoot . She was in fact arm and she was actually attacking another girl. So that's not accurate. Now contract bird said, Holy S look at what the New York time did they sanitized Crump's tweet by removing the unarmed lie. Keep in mind. The New York times story comes after the footage is released. And in fact, references, it just insanely dishonest. So the New York time takes Ben Crump's story. And it says, as we breathe a collective sigh of release a relief, we felt the sting of another shooting. So they basically just clipped out this unarmed as we experienced another string of police shootings . So, so they, they , uh, they just got rid of the unarmed part, right? Another child lost another hashtag. So they're covering, you know, they're covering for themselves. NAACP came out another black child was killed by , by the police. Our condolences to the family here is NAACP . They said, well, many of us anxiously awaiting the verdict of the George Floyd case. A black child was killed at the hands of law enforcement moments before the verdict Mikaila , Bryan was shot four times in the chest. She dies shortly thereafter. The officer in the Floyd case was found guilty on all three counts. What should have been a momentary sigh of relief relief. But however, it resulted in further unrest in Columbus, shortly after the events unfolded, NAACP president offered condolences. They viewed the body camera footage released to the public, and we have several unanswered questions. What threat did this? 16 year old girl pose to the police officer? Okay. This is an actual question in this document, the NAACP is asking what threat did this? 16 year old girl pose to the police officer? What steps were taken to deescalate the situation? Why wasn't a taser or pepper spray used finally, how does a call for help result in the death of a 16 year old child? We demand answers and accountability for the death of McCaya Brian . That is the NAACP. That is a massive organization, basically saying here, the cop should have let her stab the other girl, I guess, or pepper sprayed her. Did you see how fast that whole situation unfolded? Like in a matter of seconds, she pulls a gun out. She's in the middle of step . You saw the image, you saw the still, right? So he should have pepper sprayed her or tackled her or something. I mean, I guess, I guess that's an argument. Did he know she was 16 at the time? If he would have pepper sprayed her, do you think that that would have resulted in the cessation of the stabbing? I don't know. Could have let's take a look. We have Columbus mayor, Andrew Gunther .

Speaker 3:

You have to say, did McCaya Brian need to die yesterday? How did we get here? This is a failure on part of our community. Some are guilty, but all of did. McCaya Brian lead to die yesterday. How did we get here? This is a failure on part of our community. Some are guilty, but all of us are responsible.

Speaker 1:

Okay. All right. All of us are responsible for that. Some are guilty. What is he talking? Is he saying that this cop is guilty for this thing all , and here's Jen Sakhi over at the white house,

Speaker 8:

Mikaila Brian by the Columbus police is tragic. She was a child or thinking of her friends and family and the communities that are hurting and grieving her loss. We know that police violence, disproportionately impacts , uh , black and Latino people in communities and that black women and girls like black men and boys experience higher rates of police violence. We also know that there are particular vulnerabilities that children in foster care care like McCaya face and her death came as you noted just as America was hopeful of a step forward after the traumatic and exhausting trial of Derek Shovan and the verdict that was reached. So our focus is on , um, working to address systemic racism and implicit implicit bias head on. And of course, to passing laws and legislation that will put much needed reforms into place at police departments around the country.

Speaker 1:

So yet again, this is about race, right? Racial, injustice, racial, inequity, whatever the heck she was talking about there , uh , is going to be the centerpiece of this whole thing. Right? Look, I am not in favor of a 16 year old girl getting shot , being shot and killed. What I am in favor of is not charging an officer with a crime or anybody with a crime that it isn't a crime that they didn't deserve. Right? And this officer was stopping a stabbing from happening in real time. It's just, it's bizarre that this is coming out, that we're now asking questions about this. What if the officer didn't didn't shoot her and she got stabbed? Would they be okay with that? What if, what if MCI is still here, but the other woman's dead. Cause the officer, you know, pepper sprayed her or something or didn't react quickly. And why did they call the police in the first place? If they don't want an officer to come out there and stop a stabbing, then why did they call the police? If they want to have a knife fight, they want to just have a good old fashioned Knight fight in their neighborhood. Why did several people call the police in the first place? We have some interesting reactions over on Twitter. We have defund and abolish the police refund. Our communities , uh, Bree Newsome says teenagers have been having fights, including fights involving knives for eons. So I guess this one should have just , uh , kept going. Um, I , I personally have never been in a Knight fight. Even when I was a teenager, don't know anybody who was in a knife fight. Uh, didn't grow up in a particularly privileged , uh , middle school. I did go to a nice high school. There's no question about that. Uh, no knife fights there, but I hung out with mostly people from other high schools. So , uh, no knife fights there either. Have you ever been in a knife fight? You sorta , you know, throw in blades with people. I don't know what she's talking about. We do not need police to address these situations by showing up to the scene and using a weapon against one of the teenagers. So you do not need the police to show up well, then why they call them several people called there were at least two, nine 11 calls over there. So they call them y'all need help. I mean that sincerely. So apparently this woman grew up where there's just a knife fights going on all over the place. Uh, and , uh, Valerie Jarrett is also weighing in on this, her, she was part of the Obama team. Valerie Jarrett is an American business woman, former government officials. She served as senior advisor to president Barack Obama and assistant to the president for public engagement. Then she served as , uh , the Obama Biden transition project chair. And she's the president of the Obama foundation, right? So this is a woman who is very high up in the power echelon, not as an elected person, but as an appointed person, as part of the Obama Biden administration, she says a black teenage girl named McCaya Bryan was killed because a police officer immediately decided to shoot her multiple times in order to break up a knife, fight, demand, accountability, and fight for justice. Just because an officer can use deadly force. She said does not mean the officer should let's spend more time responsibly training them to deescalate violent situations and enforces required. Use the minimum force necessary. Here's the ACLU now chiming in. She was 16 years old and had her entire life ahead of her for the second time. In less than a week, we are collectively mourning a child killed by the police. We'll say it again. A system that kills children with impunity cannot be reformed. Mikaila Bryant should still be alive today. That's from the ACLU. They're going to go after this cop, they're going to try to indict this guy or kill him. Here is LeBron James posted this to his 50 million followers, 49.6 million followers on Twitter said , uh , posted the picture of the officer, says your next hashtag accountability with the clock ticking, right? Like we're going to come and get you, which is why I blocked his face out. If we have active threats now against the against anybody, I can't, I can't communicate that on this channel. No way. It doesn't matter who it is. So we have an active threat here from LeBron James, your next hashtag accountability, post his picture on the internet to 49.6 million followers. And ultimately he deleted it. So you'll see this, but not before it got 6,668 retweets, 4,362 quote retweet tweets, 44,000 likes. So what that means to you , uh , non Twitter ERs is a lot of people saw this, a lot, many, many millions of people saw that. Uh, so that's LeBron James. Now, your next coming after these, these officers for stopping somebody who is in the middle of stabbing somebody else, and then we have , uh, over on NBC news, MSNBC news, they are also unhappy about this. Let's listen in and see how they're framing this entire conversation.

Speaker 9:

Brian, when we talked earlier today and I said, this doesn't make me happy. It's not satisfactory. It's not justice. This doesn't necessarily change unless there was some sort of radical reform of policing and what happened 45 minutes later, the, a Bryant, a 16 year old girl in Columbus, Ohio called the police for help. An officer was on the scene and in 22 seconds, he shot her debt and honor roll student. Who's making Tik TOK videos on makeup and hair. This hasn't stopped. And I don't want to be, I want to be really clear about how critical this is not just from the emotional standpoint, from the policy standpoint. And from the national standpoint, there is nobody in America, nobody in America who was not paying attention to today's trends .

Speaker 1:

All right ? So he goes on and he says, everybody was watching the show of in trial, these cops too. So they know what they are doing. You know, anytime they pull their gun, they know exactly what they're doing. And he wanted to kill that girl. Cause she's a racist white cop, right? This is where this is going. This, this, this cop is going to get, they're going to try to skewer this guy. And it was one of the , the , the, the cleanest shoots that I have seen that we have covered here. She was in the motion, like it was a split second shot. And , uh , that other woman would have been state . You saw the still, Oh my gosh. All right. Let's take a look at some questions over from our locals community, which is the place to be watching the watchers.locals.com. If you want to support the show and ask a question first in is hack consulting says when I first saw the mother, I think she felt like she was winning the lottery, wanting to get some grifting cash. Yeah. Right. $27 million is a nice payday. You have a family that wants a piece of that. Uh , it makes me, it makes me sick to say that, but that's what it looked like. Right? They were out there auditioning in front of the media and the media shows up. They're all running with this. This is a big production on the, on the back of a 16 year old girl who was stabbing somebody LT 13 says, did you read that her aunt reported, she was living in a foster home on that street? I also heard, I heard that. I didn't confirm that, but I did read that. Also heard that Biden says she was in a foster system. Yeah . So the mom doesn't even raise her. The mom just wanted to, Oh yeah. You know, just go out there and get in front of the cameras pinky to says, is this just pushing shootings and even fake moving events to take all guns and getting our minds off of the real issues. You know, I'm not sure if it's anything that sort of masterminded orchestrated conspiratorial or whatever. But , uh, yeah. I mean, I think I see where this is going and , and the, and the takeaway is that everything the cops do is essentially wrong, right? They , they shouldn't show up. They shouldn't have even been there. And it's, it's really, buttressing the defund , the police movement. Cause this cop showed up to do a cop thing to , to stop a crime in progress, to save and preserve lives. You know, we have the defense of others in this country. There is a concept that says that you can use lethal force to defend somebody against lethal force. If somebody is going to kill somebody else, you can stop that person from committing that homicide from committing that murder is specially for cops. That's kind of, one of their primary functions is to go stop bad people doing bad things. This cop didn't know she was 16. All he sees is a, is a woman attacking another woman with a knife draws fires. Now he's going to get charged with a crime. Potentially. Pinky two says I had seen the shooting. Mom makes daughter sound very sweet, but why was she yielding a knife and trying to stab the other woman? Police officer must take her out. I mean, you have to write by Mullock . It says, Robert, that's the new trend. Now don't comply to the police. Then claim justice . Then Sue the state, settle for millions while . Thank you. Thank you. Taxpayer money, Liberty or death says that is why I can not stand Crump. He is as bad. If not worse than Al Sharpton, absolute hustler. Crump is seeing more dollar signs. I made 8.91 million off of Floyd. I wonder what I can get off of this girl. Yeah, it didn't. He work on, he's worked on a lot of these, right? So he just sort of, this is his business model. Just wait until somebody gets killed, then pontificate about it and go out there and try to sign them up. And he's got a pretty good track record to , if you are, if your daughter's killed, you want the lawyer that got the Floyd family, 27 million sharing Whitney says polishing up my crystal ball here. My predictions, there will be riots until this officer is charged and convicted of murder. Next time a person of color, someone like George Florida's arrested. There will be riots until he's acquitted and released, right.

Speaker 2:

It, you know , it's, it's a playbook.

Speaker 1:

It is one strategy. And we can see that you can kind of do it without any recourse. National populous says, I believe we need to know who the man that kicked down the person is before we can understand what really happened here. Regardless. Stopping a stabbing is the job of police.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I thought it was. I thought, I mean, I could be mistake .

Speaker 1:

I don't know what they're supposed to do, but I think that is one of the primary functions. Sharon Quinney says, the cops should go on strike, quit, or just stand by and watch folks kill each other. See what happens. Of course, this is what the revolutionaries want. When there's total chaos, folks give up their rights to a totalitarian state just to have some kind of stability. Yeah. We saw, look what happened with COVID look what happened this last year. How much have ever has everybody given up in exchange for not even anything really just , just , uh ,

Speaker 2:

Feeling like I'm doing

Speaker 1:

On the right thing. I'm saving lives because my government told me to, because Dr. Fowchee is out there saying, wrap your head around in cellophane, like 45 times. And you won't catch the Corona virus . You'll just fixate to death and be dead. But you'll at least you'll be socially distanced from everybody else in your coffin. We have Abby Fergal

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] says there is currently a sit-in at Ohio state,

Speaker 1:

State demanding. They cut ties with Columbus PD. Thankfully the police chief is hinting. They support the officer. They should, man. Th you know , that was

Speaker 2:

Look, that was, that was the only thing

Speaker 1:

That that officer could have done in my, from my perspective, norovirus as , from a legal standpoint, if the officer waited for Brian to actually stab the other person, then shoot Brian . There would not be any question as to the gallery of the shooting, or just wait for one or two stabs just to make sure

Speaker 2:

Just one or two. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Or like Joe Biden said, right. Just shoot him in the leg.

Speaker 2:

Just shoot him in the leg . I don't want to shoot him in the leg .

Speaker 1:

These people have no concept of, of , uh, real life physical interactions. That's why they , they have no idea. Just one or two steps. Yeah . Just let them stay . Can I shoot now? Maybe he should radio back in. Hey, I I'm , uh , we got a, a stabbing in progress here. Dispatch, just calling for advice. Okay. We're on step seven. Now. Need permission. Can I draw my gun and take out this stuff ?

Speaker 2:

Stabbing eight that's 10 times now, wait til she gets 15 there. Charlie going to got

Speaker 1:

15 stabs now. All right. You're now clear to fire. The Mendez in the house is what possible reform could they enact that would have prevented this? Nothing, nothing,

Speaker 2:

Nothing. There was a woman stabbing another woman

Speaker 1:

In the middle of the daylights, broad day light in the middle of Columbus, Ohio. Since none of these idiots care to be specific about that, maybe you could come up with some theories. I know I can't ,

Speaker 2:

Uh , uh, don't don't call the police, right? Don't call the police. I , you know , don't respond to these things really, or I don't know what the police could do. Just don't show up. I don't know what else they can do on these things. Justice first said yes. Uh, yesterday you see some , a clinical. So I think I got that one justice. I think I asked, answered that one previously. Oh, Oh. Um, did I, is this the one I was supposed to circle back on some tidbits

Speaker 1:

Hope for our justice system. I don't, I don't have much for you. I'm sorry about that. You know, it's part of what I'm trying to do with this show is help to educate other people about some of these concepts, like the presumption of innocence, like beyond a reasonable doubt. I think that as we start to see more of these things publicly sort of fleshed out, I am hopeful that more people will have conversations. Like this will be a part of this show will be a part of other conversations , uh, and start analyzing these issues with a critical hat on, because right now it feels to be very emotional. Now I think the only offer of hope that I have at this moment is that we're in a pendulum. You know, right now I talk about pendulums a lot. You know, they , they swing one direction and then the country sees where it's going. They don't like it. And then the pendulum swings back the other way. And I think we're sort of in one of these weird waves right now that I talk a lot about, you know, we're going through this wave where we have a weird culture. That is, that is like woke super woke culture. And we have a lot of people who have these really big ideas, like defund the police and things that, that sound good. It sort of reminds me of, you know , the sixties, like make love, not war, man. Like everything's peace and love and harmony. And that was just a phase that kind of came and went. And the reason why I think it went is because it doesn't work, right. That's not how real world is. That's not how reality functions. And so we're going to have a lot of people out there saying, well, defund the police and Shovan this and show them that. And the police shouldn't show up. And we're going to give the benefit of the doubt to every single person who is in a police interaction, who is not a police officer, right. They all get the benefit of the doubt. There are going to be some very severe consequences to this. They're going to have less officers who become officers. You have, you're gonna have people bail out of cities. You're gonna have, you know , reorientations of different communities in this country, which is really what I think ultimately needs to happen. I've said this a long time here on this show, local, I think is better. And I like the idea of people being a little bit more mobile so that they can just kind of pick up and go to different areas where maybe they're better represented by their governments and their politicians. So if you're in a city that just wants to dump on the police at every turn, if you're in Minneapolis and they just convicted, Shovan, they're going to convict the three other officers who were there. They're probably going to convict Kim Potter. Who's also very close by to that. They've paid out 47 million by my count, 20 million to the Knorr case and other 27 million to the Floyd family. You've got now calls for defunding . The police sort of bubbling up yet. Again, they tried that once already in Minneapolis didn't work out for them. They had to bring the money back and rehire some police. But

Speaker 2:

You know, the , the, the, the people

Speaker 1:

Who are the engine of society who actually make things work, they're going to get tired of being dumped on. At some point in time, I have the same concept with taxes, right? And if you want to tax all of the rich, right, we're to punish the rich by taxing the rich, they don't care. They just leave. They just, they just go somewhere else because they have the wherewithal, the mechanism to do that. They just take their money. They go to a different state. They, you know , form a new , uh , business entity and they move money around and they figure it out law enforcement agencies going to do the same thing, right? Cops are going to do the same thing. They're going to say Minneapolis doesn't sound good. Where is a better law enforcement community? What is a better police agency to work for? What's a better environment. And you know , it's not going to happen overnight. It may take 10 years, but there will be a realignment. And then after that happens, we're going to see consequences. You're going to see an Exodus . You're going to see a reorientation of our justice system from the people who sort of make it work from the people who are the gears in the system right now, all of these criticisms are coming from people who are external to the system. You have people, you know , like, like Nancy Pelosi and AOC talking about

Speaker 2:

Justice, to my knowledge,

Speaker 1:

Neither one of them are lawyers. They have no idea about any of this stuff. They sort of just use this as a political football, but that only goes so far. Eventually the people who you rely on to actually run things, they're going to say enough of this already. And when that happens, the pendulum is going to swing the other way, because there will be more crime. There's going to be a lot more social unrest that we'll probably see these little no-go zones in certain big cities that , that police just say, good luck. Right. You know , every time we go there , uh, you know , we get, we get arrested or, or , uh, you know, indicted on in the court of public opinion about what we do to serve our own community. So we're not going to serve you anymore. You don't want us, we don't want you by . And you know , so we may have a period of darkness when we're all sort of wondering what our justice system looks like, and then what's going to happen. It's going to be even worse. Remember what happened in the 1990s, we had a big sort of, you know, crime wave that our politicians were , uh , puffing up for everybody. And they passed a bunch of really draconian crime bills that we all have to still live with. And so it's this cycle, right? Really increased hyper-partisan enforcement. We have a weaponizing of the justice system, but people are going to see that and they're going to start clamoring for a new system. So I don't know

Speaker 2:

Ultimately what that looks like truly.

Speaker 1:

I mean, if I can be candid about it, I've said this before previously, I like the idea of, you know, this, this concept of a network state, and sort of creating these little , uh , dis contiguous zones where people sort of reorganize and pick up and move and say, we're just not, we're not going to put up with that crap anymore. We're going to go negotiate our own little , uh, you know, nation States that are network States that we just, we, we, we start from scratch, right ? Because rebuild up , uh , a system that actually functions because I'm not so sure that , that, that this is going to be functional for much longer. If we see this, continue, this trend continue moving forward. If cops just are automatically guilty in every interaction, that's not good. Right? And , and that that's going to cause some very serious ripple effects that we're all going to have to live with. And the people who are celebrating this right now, you know, their communities are going to be the hardest hit. Unfortunately, it's not going to be the politicians in DC or the CNN anchors, wherever they're living, right. It's going to be the people in cities, in communities that have to deal with the absent police as a result of their own condemnation of them. It's going to be a problem. We have noro , Vajra says special instructions for white people visiting. What is this? Welcome to George Floyd square. This is where he took his last breath. Enter with reverence care for each other, for white people in PA . It's this real Nora decenter yourself, come and listen. Be mindful of whether your volume, pace and movements seek to contribute energy of the space. Consider if you want to need or take photos and post them do not take photos of other people without their consent. If you're whiteness, if you whiteness white folks doing problematic things, speak up with compassion, take the burden off the black folks. And yeah. So, so why would you even go, right? So let's say you want to go and pay homage to George Floyd. You have all these special rules, a pass pass on that we have, mafic says going to be a surprise coming from me. Most likely Masa says, this is a quintessential use of deadly force for police. This is what the standard should be to utilize deadly force, a very real inactive threat that you have no other option, but to shoot, to stop. It it's a tragedy. She was 16, but I would never expect the potential victims to be forced to wait until officers attempted to exhaust other options while they're being actively stabbed to try something else. Robert, this was the correct call. And I hope the officer can deal with having to do this with having had to do this in his line of work. Yeah. I mean, a lot of people are considering the 16 year old. You make a great point. Mom , a lot of people are really focused on McCaya right? She's dead. She's a 16 year old girl. She got shot and killed terrible. I don't condone that at all. But what about the woman who was going to be stabbed? Should we have had more conversations about that? Um , I'm going to guess. She's pretty thrilled that this officer saved her life. Right? And knife, stabbings are not a joke. Okay ? It's not like the movies, you know, nights are extremely, extremely lethal. They will kill you quickly. And that was a big one. It wasn't a Swiss army knife or something like that. Right. That was a big metal blade. Officer saved a woman's life. And he's going to be charged with a crime for that. He's got all these people screaming for his head. He's got LeBron James saying, you're next, buddy? What? Yeah, you're right, mom. This was the right call. You're right. Pat myself on the back right there. Thank you. Ma'am all right . So our last segment of the day, we've got bad Popo here in Arizona and around the world. But today we've got a good Popo as well because we have this convergence of a bad Popo and a good Popo in this next story, because one officer arrested another officer on suspicion of DUI. We're talking about officer Julian ready , who is actually here in Arizona. He's a P Pinel County. Sheriff's officer Pinel County is one County over from Eric Copa County. And so he is now in some serious hot water. And we're going to pour some , uh, some gas on that. So let's take a quick look at what's going on here. This is over from NBC news has a new video shows Arizona deputy use a racial slur and then beg for release after a DUI stop. Very bad Popo, no racial slurs that's bad. And you should not try to use your position as law enforcement to get out of custody. He says, this says newly obtained body camera video captured in Arizona. Sheriff's deputy using a racial slur, slur and pleading to be let off the hook. After an officer pulled him out of a vehicle in December on suspicion of DUI Pinella County Sheriff's deputy Julianne Navaretti was stopped after an Arizona state university police officer observed him speeding and swerving at about 2:00 AM on December 5th. All right. So sometime ago, according to ASU police report Navaretti was out with friends at the time of the arrest. The report said when the ASU officer confronted the auth deputy about driving under the influence video obtained by NBC , which we're going to show you. He says, he's admitting saying, yeah, I was drinking, but I'm also a police officer. Okay. This type of crap happens all the time. And I, I a repeatedly say that this is a problem that the police, they have that blue shield, that blue code of silence. You can look it up. I think there's a Wikipedia entry about this, but essentially, you know, cops, when they catch other cops doing bad things, they circle the wagons. They give everybody a pass. They flash their badge. Oh, you're a cop too . All right, listen, man, just, you know, don't do it again, go home, whatever. Uh, and , and that happens very regularly. And I have a huge, huge problem with that because it's one cop allowing another bad cop to get away with bad things. And the cops are supposed to be the enforcers of the law, the upholders of the law, not the people who bend the rules for their friends and colleagues. So , uh, so that was starting to happen here. Okay. This, this, this deputy Julia nav already . It's like, Hey, I'm a cop. I'm a police officer. Give me a break. My friend cop number two, doesn't comply. He asks , how much have you had to drink tonight? So says the arresting officer, just a couple of drinks, nav already flashed the officer, his badge, according to footage, officer then asked never ready to step out of his car. After confirming he worked for the Sheriff's office. Never ready , says I've done this whole spiel, man, what are we going through? Now? I've already said in response, can we let anybody else in the vehicle go through this? Can we let anybody else in the vehicle go through? So it's this guy right here. Very bad Popo. Here. He is from the body camera. He's in Arizona. He's around here. Never ready. Now I want to point this out, right? It says he whips out his badge. He flashes his badge. The officer shows the other officer, his badge. Now two ways to interpret this, right? Of course, one way is to the benefit of the officer law enforcement. Hey, we're both law enforcement. I'm supposed to show you that I'm law enforcement. You know, typically that's part of their policies and procedures. Hey, if you're stopped, if you're law enforcement notify that you're law enforcement and they justify this for officer's safety and communication, right. Just to communicate with each other, there's no other reason that that's required. Like you're not going to give them a benefit of the doubt. You're not going to give them a warning. If you find out that they're an officer instead of a ticket, are you ? Of course ,

Speaker 2:

Of course they would . They would never do that. But they do.

Speaker 1:

I have to communicate it from one officer to another. So that's the benefit of the doubt reading, right? It's him saying, Hey FYI, I'm an officer. I actually have a firearm in here. Uh I'm somebody who knows, you know how this procedure works? What do you need from me? I'm gonna be totally compliant. Uh, you can let your guard down. I I'm going to be working with you. What do you need?

Speaker 2:

That's one way to do it. Or it's like this guy, can we let anybody else in the vehicle, go through this. I've done this whole spiel.

Speaker 1:

And so what does that look like under the law? Can you be charged with a crime for something like that? Let's take a quick Gander. So we have impersonating a public servant, right? A person commits, impersonating a public servant. Now you can say, he's not impersonating

Speaker 2:

A public servant, right? Because he's , uh , he's .

Speaker 1:

He is actually a public servant. Yeah . But not in this capacity, not on that particular day. So if he's throwing this out there, if he pretends to be a public service and he says, Hey, I'm an officer like, like right now. And I'm engaging in any conduct with the intent to induce another, to submit to his pretended official authority or to rely on his pretended official acts. Well , maybe this could be a class one

Speaker 2:

Misdemeanor, right? Potentially, maybe the person

Speaker 1:

Who knowingly attempts by means of bribery or misrepresentation. This is a different statute. Obstruction of criminal investigations may be misrepresentation, intimidation, or force or threats to delay prevents the communication of information or testimony relating to a violation of a statute to a peace officer, magistrate prosecutor or grand jury. Oh,

Speaker 2:

Okay. Bribery, misrepresentation,

Speaker 1:

Intimidation, maybe intimidation is a good one. Maybe you could say that this officer was saying, Hey, I'm a deputy. Here's my badge. That type of stuff is a crime. Other people get charged with crimes for this stuff. Okay. If you get stopped and you say, listen, I'm on the board of something. Uh, we have a lot of power here, so why don't you let me go. Otherwise , uh , maybe there'll be repercussions coming for you guess what? That's a crime, right? You're not allowed to , to, to, to make those types of implied threats. Now, not saying this guy did that, but if you start flashing your badge around,

Speaker 2:

It's kind of that little bro code that's going on.

Speaker 1:

All right. So we have some more from the article that we're going to take a quick look at the video. ASU officer said it didn't matter if he's a deputy. He said, well, then he said, then that puts my job at risk. Right? And I've already said, officer responded, you don't think it's going to put mine at risk. If I don't do this nav already responds, dude. I understand. But can I, can I, maybe someone else put like behind the wheel behind the wheel, never already said, don't put my f-ing career at risk. He pleaded for his release again. ASU officer said, this is a New York

Speaker 2:

Man. He said New York. He says

Speaker 1:

The N word and word, probably N N and probably ending with an a, if you want to guesstimate what that word is from never ready. He says, I'm from Arizona, dude. I'm not from New York. After the ASU officer conducted a field sobriety test, never ready . Took a breathalyzer. Test, blew a 0.1 to one, which is over the legal limit of 0.08 in Arizona. But it's under the super, I'm sorry. It's under the extreme DUI, which is at a 0.15. Now I've already was arrested on DUI charge, taken into custody at the ASU police station. Then now I've already asked the officer why he didn't give him a pass. According to the footage. He said, you couldn't even give me the opportunity to park the car. He said, no one reported it. Very bad Popo. Now we have a good Popo who responds and says, listen, the fact that you're telling me that tells me you shouldn't be an officer Bravo, ASU officer, well done spokesman for the Pinel County Sheriff's office told KP annex that nav already was initially placed on modified duty. During that time he was prohibited from driving a patrol car. Well, probably because his license was suspended at that time. So the way that it works is you get charged with a DUI. Your license is suspended for 90 days in Arizona, 30 days, total suspension, the next 60, you can get a restricted license. So if he got stopped on December 5th, then right about now is when he'd be getting his license back. So of course he was on modified duty. His license was suspended. So he can't drive a patrol car. So you have a law enforcement officer who can't even drive a car because he's facing criminal charges. He was on modified duty. He rode with another deputy while taking regular calls for service. All right . Here's the video

Speaker 7:

Drinking dude and you're driving. Yeah, but I'm also a police officer,

Speaker 4:

ASU cops pulling over Pinel County. Sheriff's deputy Julia Navarrette after a night out in 10 P back in December around two in the morning, an ASU police officer pulling Navarrette over nearby Clint talking university saying he saw the then 26, years-old speeding and swerving. Navarrette quickly showing the officer, his badge. The officer says he smelled of alcohol asking Navarra to step out of the car, Red asking the officer to consider the fact that he's in law enforcement too .

Speaker 7:

Doesn't matter if you're an officer or not, do not listen to me , my job at risk. Right? You don't think it's going to put my at risk if I don't do this, I understand. But can I can , can I maybe some else, but behind the real , behind the wheel and don't put my

Speaker 4:

Pinel County Sheriff's deputy then using a racial slur,

Speaker 7:

Man. Okay. I'm from Arizona, dude. Watch your mouth.

Speaker 4:

Never at blue appoint one to one, the officer was arrested for driving under the influence back at the police station. Never right . Continuing to ask the ASU officer why he couldn't let him off. The, the fact that you're telling me that tells me you're a spokesperson for the Pinel County Sheriff's office says the department initially put Navara on modified duty, but now PCs so confirms he's back to regular duty, declining to comment further saying he's currently the subject of an internal investigation related to this incident. 12 news briefly spoke with him on the phone beyond kupono 12 news.

Speaker 1:

All right . So yeah, you know what sounded , uh , sounded like he was trying to talk his way out of that and that other officer to his credit Barry . Very good Popo. Want to make sure that we , we acknowledge that don't know that officer's name, but he says you should not be an officer. If you are trying to get out of this citation. That officer good officer, both there together, let's wrap up this story. Spokesmen from Pinel County said that he was initially placed on modified duty during that time, like, as I , as I said, prohibited from driving a car, rode with another deputy. However, on Monday he returned to regular duty. So this officer is back on duty. As of yesterday, spokesman declined to comment further but said the deputy Navaretti is currently the subject of an internal investigation related to this incident as such, we can not discuss the case. ASU police department said our officers handled themselves in a professional manner as they would with any subject. They encounter outstanding work. Gentlemen, Navarrette told the news station, he did not wanna make a comment. And they tried to Keck to catch them today. They were not able to catch him either. So very bad Popo. Now of course the police department, they just said , Oh , whatever they were back on, regular duty, you figure it out. Uh , you think you're innocent? Yeah , you're going to contest it in court. All right. Great. So , uh , not, not, not good, not good, bad, bad, bad Popo. There let's take some questions over from locals.com. We want to say, Hey, to hack consulting says, people keep forgetting that while cops are humans, cops are still a job for forms are done with police are bad. And also when police are not shining everyone shoes haven't gotten shot yet. But I do my best to make sure that I lessen my chances of being shot. It's a good strategy. Something that everybody should try to do less than your chances of being shot. I only talk nicely with cops when talking about things, unrelated to whatever is going on, they are off duty. And when the hardest part of the stop is over and rapport is capable. Yeah, that's a good, that's a good comment. There are hack consulting and I think that's that's relevant, right? Cops are just people. So they're not 100% heroes. They're also not 100% monsters. They're not 100% racists or 100%. Anti-racist right. They are people. There are good cops, amazing cops, incredible outstanding cops. We wish we had millions of them. And there were some pretty bad ones. And there are some in between. And I think the only way that we can really really see some meaningful reform in our system is with accountability and transparency. We have to open up that box and see what's inside before we can start really working any meaningful solutions. And so those are great questions. I want to thank you for sending all of those over. And so we're going to wrap up for the day. We got some things we got to get to before we close out the show before we do, I want to tell you where I'm going after this, I'm going to have dinner. I have some very special people in town, my aunt and uncle, and I want to say hello to them. I think they're watching the show right now. In fact, let's give them a shout out. Hello, uncle Joe and aunt Bev, welcome to Arizona. Uh , these are two very important people in my life. And I wanted to tell you a quick story about , uh , about them actually. So they're in town. They come in town every now and then. And , uh , uncle Joe has been somebody who's been in my life for a long period of time , my whole life, right. He's my , uh, my oldest uncle. So my mom is one of seven people. Uncle Joe is the oldest. He's sort of the, kind of the patriarch of the family. You know, the, the, the eldest that everybody kind of looks up to gives us some guidance in , in my life. He's always been somebody who has been the person with answers and it'd be fun . You know, growing up, I would come to him with questions and I would ask him his opinion on certain things. He's extremely , uh, you know , high, highly educated he's somebody who is , um, you know , had had a very, very impressive career in medicine, very intellectual, extremely intelligent. And so in my life, he's been somebody that I've always kind of looked up to. And , um , and he's actually been relatively instrumental in my political disposition and sort of some of the things that I think about that I talk about on this show, you know, I've had uncle Joe in my life, my whole life growing up. And so there , there have been some things that have stuck with me as I have matured. And so one of the things I was thinking about as I wanted to give them a shout out today, when I was young, remember, you know, we've, we've gone through so many different sort of health phases in my life and they changed dramatically. I don't even know which one we're on now. Are we on vegan still? Is it gluten-free still, I don't know if it's paleo or keto. I can't keep track anymore. Is it the one meal a day? Is it the carnivore diet? The, you know, the plant-based or whatever? I can't tell. Right. It's , it's, it's very complicated. And so when I was growing up, we were, we were in one of those cycles and I forget what the heck, you know, whatever it was. But we were having a conversation about this and my uncle Joe lives up in , uh, uh, in , uh, Seattle, Oregon up in that area, you know, he's got , uh , properties up there. And so he was, we were having a conversation about it. And we were asking about how it was living in that part of the country. We all know that there are special people in that country, especially politically. And one of the first things, I was a teenager, he , he called them something that stuck with me. I think I was, you know , 12, 13, 14, whatever. He called them, granola, crunchers. He said, all, you know, all of , all of these granola crunchers up there in , uh , Yakima, Washington, or whatever , um, you know, they're, they're making life difficult. And so that's that just sort of stuck with me, right? These granola crunchers. And I thought it was hilarious. One of the funniest sort of labels for people, because I knew exactly what they're talking about. Now. I sort of call them, you know, the Starbucks, a screenplay people, you know, the people who go over there and , uh , you know, sort of fake, like they're doing something meaningful in the world. It's the , it's the people who eat granola. How do you know they eat granola? Well , they tell you about it. How do you know somebody who does CrossFit? They tell you about it. How do you know somebody who's a vegan? They tell you about it. They make sure that, you know about it back then, you know, 20 years ago it was granola and whatever was going on back then. But the granola crunch crunchers today have been modified into whatever we're dealing with. You know, the , the, whatever people, you know, there's, we , we have them. And so, you know , the point is , uh , uncle Joe, thank you for that. Right? You've been somebody who's been very, very important in my life. And a lot of those little lessons that we had conversations about as I was growing up, have stuck with me into our are today. They they've helped me become the guy that I am today. And I want to say, shout out to aunt Bev as well. You know, my , my aunt Bev and uncle Joe, they are high school sweethearts. They have been married longer than I've been alive. And it is such a cool thing. It's such an amazing couple. And I'm so grateful that you both are in town. I can not wait to see you. I'm heading right over there as soon as the show is over. And so big shout out to you, both. Thanks for taking the time to watch the show. And so that's uncle Joe and aunt Bev. Big shout out to you. Thank you both. And I'm sure that , uh , the people in the chat are also welcoming. You appreciate all that you've done for me and for the world. So thank you to you both also want to thank everybody over on locals. We have some new people who signed up. I want to welcome Davis parks . Welcome to the community. If you want to sign up, by the way, you can check that out [email protected] So go check that out. Uh, David's David Davis parks is in the house. We have any, Guther got her gun. Ooh. And he got her gun is in the house. We have rust us or rust us. We have little TLC, little TLC in the house. We have AB Taylor, six, five, eight. Welcome Catherine Lee in the house. We have girlie zero nine, nine. Welcome to our community. J underscore not TK is in the house. Black dog, five, four , two . Welcome to you. Our holiday. We have L crew S we have Hugin Menin in the house. We've got a lot of people who signed up and the list keeps going. Welcome to Daniel Barbosa . Welcome. We have blazing guns in the house saw you today. Napalm grenade is also in the house. TX , Texas land girl, a Texas Island girl is in the house. Chris zero zero one. Welcome Taryn . M good to see you. Zach B as in the house, Patrick carry 82, signed up X, X, Y O R O Y X X is in the house and big truck. Becca , welcome to the community. And you can sign up if you want to join in on that fond and ask questions and be a part of the show and support us and download a bunch of free, great stuff and get promo codes to all sorts of stuff. Do [email protected] And I want to thank all of the people. Of course, who asked some questions today? You know who you are. You're on that list. Thank you for the great feedback, the great questions. And then let's give some shout outs to other people who are part of the locals community. So we'll give some shout outs. We've got a center of East 91. We have rags in the house. Hello to David Meunier . We have tweak . We got Whipple. Number one, Dutch girl, nine, five, six. We got Sandy paws in the house. Welcome to you. All of these people are [email protected] and what's so important about locals is it's a , it's a separate platform, you know, on some of these other areas, some of these YouTube and Facebook, and some of these other platforms are kind of beholden

Speaker 2:

To the big tech platform

Speaker 1:

And locals. It's, it's a lot of independent creators talking about independent things. And all of these people make that possible. We talk about, you know, this, this concept of the network effect and people want to go where other people are. And so when we first started this community,

Speaker 2:

It was a little bit of a, you know, it was empty. Not not many people were there and that's not as fun, but when you join us over there, you help it become

Speaker 1:

More fun and you help make it. So other people want to be there also. And so you're , you're like literally helping to build a separate independent platform, brick by brick. And I just really appreciate that. That gives us a little bit more autonomy. It gives me a little bit more security makes me feel like, okay, you know, if , if YouTube decides to pull the plug on us, we've got a little bit of a backup platform. And so thank you for, for signing up and for helping us build and fortify the show. I also want to tell you, you can download a bunch of great stuff over there. Get a copy of my existence systems beginning to winning. I'm sorry. Beginning to winning is available here. Existence systems is now an online course. So

Speaker 2:

On locals, you can download

Speaker 1:

The book as a free book, free PDF grab that of course can also grab the slides that we went through today. Those are available for your download. You can get a copy of my impeachment party template is available there. The existence system template is also available if you're a local subscriber and there is also a promo code for the new online course, and it's, it's available. It's up it's right now. If you want to go and check it out, you can go over to existence systems.com and it's going to walk you through how to build this. This is my existence system. When you open it up, you're going to see, this is my little personal productivity tool that I use every day. And so the program is about creating a version of this for yourself. It's about going through and modifying each one of these different modules. I have 32 videos, about two hours and 19 minutes of content in there. And it guides you through bit by bit on how to fill out each one of these blocks, how to put your affirmations in, define your energy blocks, figure out what your life pillars are, what your mission is, what your purpose is. And so it's available. Now. You can go buy it if you want to , to , to join in on it. It's very inexpensive. The website is it is, it is existence systems.com. There's a promo code. If you're a local subscriber. So going over to locals, you get a pretty significant little discount there. And this is what the template looks like. If you want to really take a quicker, look

Speaker 2:

At it, it's available now.

Speaker 1:

And I'm super excited about it. And that's my first kind of attempt at a public offering like this. So there are probably some kinks I got to work out at some point, but it's functional. I've tested it. It's it's, it's, it's there. It's ready. And so I would appreciate any feedback, any thoughts, any likes or dislikes, any constructive criticism, feedback, whatever, if you want to send that way, I would be very, very appreciative of it because this is something that I think , um, you know, I may , I may want to sink a little bit more time into about, you know, communicating some of these ideas in a structured way that is useful for people. And so this is my first attempt at it. And so I'd be humbled. Uh , if you gave it a look, existence, systems.com is the address. And then that my friends, that is it for me, we've got nothing left. We've gone two hours big, a lot of great, great show, a lot of content, a lot of outstanding questions. And I'm very appreciative that you are a part of the show. And so I want to leave you with that final. Thank you. We're going to be back here tomorrow. Same place, same time. It's at 4:00 PM. Arizona time, 5:00 PM, mountain time, 6:00 PM. Central 7:00 PM on the East coast. And for that one, Florida, man, everybody have a very lovely evening. Hopefully you had a nice dinner. If not get some food in that belly rest. Well, I will see you back here tomorrow. Have a good night. Bye-bye .